Considered Service-specific journals were Journal of Service Research, Journal of Service Management, Journal of Services Marketing, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, Service Industries Journal, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, and Service Science.

For more information about the alert system methodology go here

For all previous alerts go here

Appau, S., J. L. Ozanne and J. G. Klein (2020): Understanding Difficult Consumer Transitions: The In/Dividual Consumer in Permanent Liminality, Journal of Consumer Research, 47(2), pp.167-191

Some life transitions are difficult and prolonged, such as becoming an independent adult, forming a family, or adopting healthy consumption habits. Permanent liminality describes transitions that can span years and even a lifetime with no anticipated end. To understand how consumers are caught in permanent liminality, we examine how Pentecostal converts consume religious services in their difficult transition from the secular “world” to Pentecostalism. We draw on the concept of in / dividual personhood to explain how the Pentecostal dividual is coconstituted in an endless movement between the undesired “worldly” in / dividual and the contiguous incorporation into the desired Pentecostal in / dividual and structure. Pentecostals’ permanent liminality thus involves ongoing cycles of separation and incorporation within zones of indeterminacy, in which neither separation nor incorporation is ever completed. This theoretical framework explains the unfinished transition of Pentecostal converts as contested dividuals. We extend this theoretical explanation for future research on liquid modernity and consumers caught in permanent liminality.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/jcr/ucaa010 [Google]

 

Kong, Q., S. Li, N. Liu, C.-P. Teo and Z. Yan (2020): Appointment Scheduling Under Time-Dependent Patient No-Show Behavior, Management Science, (), pp.3480-3500

This paper studies how to schedule medical appointments with time-dependent patient no-show behavior and random service times. The problem is motivated by our studies of independent datasets from countries in two continents that unanimously identify a significant time-of-day effect on patient show-up probabilities. We deploy a distributionally robust model, which minimizes the worst-case total expected costs of patient waiting and service provider’s idling and overtime, by optimizing the scheduled arrival times of patients. This model is challenging because evaluating the total cost for a given schedule involves a linear program with uncertainties present in both the objective function and the right-hand side of the constraints. In addition, the ambiguity set considered contains discrete uncertainties and complementary functional relationships among these uncertainties (namely, patient no-shows and service durations). We show that when patient no-shows are exogenous (i.e., time-independent), the problem can be reformulated as a copositive program and then be approximated by semidefinite programs. When patient no-shows are endogenous on time (and hence on the schedule), the problem becomes a bilinear copositive program. We construct a set of dual prices to guide the search for a good schedule and use the technique iteratively to obtain a near-optimal solution. Our computational studies reveal a significant reduction in total expected cost by taking into account the time-of-day variation in patient show-up probabilities as opposed to ignoring it. This paper was accepted by David Simchi-Levi, optimization.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2019.3366 [Google]

 

Pavlov, O. V. and E. Katsamakas (2020): Will colleges survive the storm of declining enrollments? A computational model, PLOS ONE, 15(8), pp.e0236872

The approaching decline in the U.S. college-age population, sometimes referred to as a “demographic storm,” has been identified as an existential threat to the future of American colleges and universities. This article conducts a model-driven analysis of three plausible college-level responses to declining applications. It draws on systems theory to conceptualize a tuition-dependent college as a complex service system and to develop a system dynamics model that captures key causal interrelationships and multiple feedback effects between faculty, facilities, tuition revenue, financials, reputation, and outcomes. Simulations with the college model suggest that common solutions such as reducing faculty or adding campus facilities may improve the college’s short-term financial position, but they are insufficient to ensure its long-term viability. This model contributes to the research literature on the economics of higher education, and model-driven academic management and strategy. It also provides useful implications and insights that can inform policy-makers and college leaders.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0236872 [Google]

 

Fletcher-Brown, J., S. Turnbull, G. Viglia, T. Chen and V. Pereira (2020): Vulnerable consumer engagement: How corporate social media can facilitate the replenishment of depleted resources, International Journal of Research in Marketing, (), pp.

Technology may facilitate health and wellbeing consumer engagement. When there is scant public health provision and socio-cultural norms marginalize consumers stigmatized from cancer, we reveal how a brand’s corporate social media campaign can support vulnerable consumers with resource constraints. Drawing from a transformative consumer research lens, we investigate five years of computer-mediated communications facilitated by the Indian brand Dabur Vatika. Through a grounded theory and an abductive reasoning approach, we unveil how vulnerable consumers directly or indirectly affected by cancer leverage brand’s social media to replenish resources. First, we identify how vulnerable consumers engage to replenish depleted emotional and social support resources. We further expand consumer engagement scholarship by offering a preliminary definition of “vulnerable consumer engagement”. Second, we provide a nascent classification of vulnerable consumers in a consumer-producer role, Principal Vulnerable Consumers and Associate Vulnerable Consumers, distinguished by their proximity to the vulnerable context. Lastly, we reveal how brands may perform a transformative role, to replenish social, emotional and operant resources at the micro level through the engagement of vulnerable consumers with corporate social media. This insight is informative for policymakers, advertising practitioners and transformative consumer research academics.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijresmar.2020.06.002 [Google]

 

Golmohammadi, A., A. S. Mattila and D. K. Gauri (2020): Negative online reviews and consumers’ service consumption, Journal of Business Research, 116(), pp.27-36

The growing reliance on the Internet as an information source for services raises the need for more research focusing on electronic word of mouth (eWOM). Drawing on construal level theory and the sunk costs fallacy, we examine how psychological distance and prior investments in information search influence service consumers’ reactions to negative eWOM. We find that when consumers perceive the service consumption to be psychologically proximal, temporal investments in information search diminish the impact of negative eWOM on behavioral intentions. This effect is so robust that even a highly negative forum consensus does not mitigate it. Conversely, when the consumption experience is perceived as distal, temporal investments fail to buffer the impact of negative eWOM, and a forum consensus magnifies the impact. Our findings have important implications for service firms, as service consumers may make many of their evaluations and decisions under the influence of psychological distance and sunk costs.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2020.05.004 [Google]

 

Leung, T. Y., P. Sharma, P. Adithipyangkul and P. Hosie (2020): Gender equity and public health outcomes: The COVID-19 experience, Journal of Business Research, 116(), pp.193-198

This paper extends the growing research on the impact of gender equity on public health outcomes using the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic as its research setting. Specifically, it introduces a conceptual model incorporating the impact of gender equity and human development on women’s representation in legislature and public health expenditure, and their combined impact with human environment (population density, aging population and urban population) on important public health outcomes in the Covid-19 context, including the total number of tests, diagnosed, active and critical cases, and deaths. Data from 210 countries shows support for many of the hypothesized relationships in the conceptual model. The results provide useful insights about the factors that influence the representation of women in political systems around the world and its impact on public health outcomes. The authors also discuss implications for public health policy-makers to ensure efficient and effective delivery of public health services in future.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2020.05.031 [Google]

 

Robinson, S., C. Orsingher, L. Alkire, A. De Keyser, M. Giebelhausen, K. N. Papamichail, P. Shams and M. S. Temerak (2020): Frontline encounters of the AI kind: An evolved service encounter framework, Journal of Business Research, 116(), pp.366-376

Artificial intelligence (AI) is radically transforming frontline service encounters, with AI increasingly playing the role of employee or customer. Programmed to speak or write like a human, AI is poised to usher in a frontline service revolution. No longer will frontline encounters between customer and employee be simply human-to-human; rather, researchers must consider an evolved paradigm where each actor could be either human or AI. Further complicating this 2 × 2 framework is whether the human, either customer or employee, recognizes when they are interacting with a non-human exchange partner. Accordingly, we develop an evolved service encounter framework and, in doing so, introduce the concept of counterfeit service, interspecific service (AI-to-human), interAI service (AI-to-AI), and offer a research agenda focused on the implementation of AI in dyadic service exchanges.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.08.038 [Google]

 

Wünderlich, N. V., J. Hogreve, I. N. Chowdhury, H. Fleischer, S. Mousavi, J. Rötzmeier-Keuper and R. Sousa (2020): Overcoming vulnerability: Channel design strategies to alleviate vulnerability perceptions in customer journeys, Journal of Business Research, 116(), pp.377-386

Research has shown that any individual consumer, regardless of membership in any particular class, may experience vulnerability in the marketplace. While studies have identified core determinants of customer vulnerability states and perceptions and outlined their impact on consumers and firms, there is little research on how channel design, as part of service design strategies, can be employed to alleviate or prevent states and perceptions of vulnerability. This study extends the current literature on customer vulnerability by developing a framework that delineates determinants and consequences of vulnerability that manifest in problems of accessing or processing resources. We outline three relevant channel design strategies that service providers might employ to alleviate vulnerability: (1) flexibility through multiple multichannel paths, (2) guidance through constrained channel paths and (3) proactive initiation of interactions. Additionally, we propose a future research agenda and offer recommendations for managerial practice regarding how to identify customer vulnerability and employ countermeasures.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.07.027 [Google]

 

Story, V., J. Zolkiewski, K. Verleye, A. Nazifi, C. Hannibal, A. Grimes and L. Abboud (2020): Stepping out of the shadows: Supporting actors’ strategies for managing end-user experiences in service ecosystems, Journal of Business Research, 116(), pp.401-411

In service ecosystems not all actors have direct relationships with end users, yet they are often critical for delivering better service experiences. Specific events (e.g. service failures) may require these supporting actors, who are often hidden during regular customer experience journeys, to become visible when deviations or disruptions occur. Deciding whether and when to come out of the shadows presents a complex managerial challenge for ecosystem actors providing supporting services, with important implications for end user’s experiences. We examine strategies that service ecosystem actors can adopt for managing end-user experiences in complex ecosystems, and the implications for themselves and other ecosystem actors. Based upon two dimensions, visibility and synchronization, six experience management strategies are outlined and contrasted. Using case vignettes, we explore how and when such strategies might be adopted and potential impacts on service sellers and end-user experiences during regular and atypical service journeys, and present future research propositions.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2020.04.029 [Google]

 

Keiningham, T., L. Aksoy, H. L. Bruce, F. Cadet, N. Clennell, I. R. Hodgkinson and T. Kearney (2020): Customer experience driven business model innovation, Journal of Business Research, 116(), pp.431-440

Business model innovation (BMI) is critical to a firm’s ability to achieve growth and long-term viability. It helps improve the value of products or services and/or delivery of these offerings to customers. Much of the academic literature to date however lacks customer-driven business model innovation frameworks. As such, the aim of this investigation is to propose a customer experience driven (CX) business model innovation framework that aligns customer values and the firm’s strategic needs. This paper contributes to the literature by (a) conceptualizing the way in which business model innovation and customer experience are related (b) providing managers with a concrete framework to guide business model innovation that supports customer experience-driven new services and (c) highlighting opportunities for future research to advance business model innovation research and practice.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.08.003 [Google]

 

Kreuzer, M., V. Cado and K. Raïes (2020): Moments of care: How interpersonal interactions contribute to luxury experiences of healthcare consumers, Journal of Business Research, 116(), pp.482-490

This study introduces the notion of “moments of care,” which describe short-lived and prosocial interpersonal interactions between healthcare consumers and medical staff, as individually defined luxuries. Findings from 30 phenomenological interviews with patients of a luxury ophthalmic clinic reveal that healthcare consumers experience moments of care through (1) authentic presence, (2) balanced power relationship, and (3) interpersonal synchrony. This study contributes a phenomenological experiential perspective to the growing body of research on unconventional aspects of luxury by showing that experiencing humanity in interpersonal interactions is “true luxury” and surpasses material luxury. The findings provide a valuable source of inspiration for private and public medical institutions as well as for branded service providers.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.11.033 [Google]

 

Vargo, S. L., M. A. Akaka and H. Wieland (2020): Rethinking the process of diffusion in innovation: A service-ecosystems and institutional perspective, Journal of Business Research, 116(), pp.526-534

The diffusion of innovation is generally referred to as the spread or adoption of a technology within a social context. This view separates technological and market aspects of innovation by relying on an underlying assumption of a unidirectional flow of innovation–that is, from the technological side to the market side. More recent work, however, points toward more dynamic, inclusive, and integrative approaches to studying innovation and diffusion. We develop a theoretical framework for rethinking the process of diffusion in innovation, using a service-centered, ecosystems, and institutional lens. This framework helps to overcome narrow conceptions that separate technological aspects of innovation from processes of diffusion or adoption, and highlights the importance of institutional change. Specifically, our framework does not privilege one actor as an innovator/producer and another as an adopter/consumer, but rather considers all actors as resource integrators, and diffusion as a critical part of recursive innovation processes.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2020.01.038 [Google]

 

Trischler, J., M. Johnson and P. Kristensson (2020): A service ecosystem perspective on the diffusion of sustainability-oriented user innovations, Journal of Business Research, 116(), pp.552-560

• The service ecosystem helps to explain the (non)diffusion of user innovations. • Addressing sustainability challenges requires an innovation infrastructure inclusive of users. • User innovation diffusion relies on a multi-actor contribution. This article conceptualizes the diffusion of user innovations from a service ecosystem perspective. With the focus on sustainable innovations, the service ecosystem is evaluated, along with other systemic innovation concepts, as a possible theoretical basis for explaining the first adoption and diffusion of user innovations. It is proposed that an ecosystem perspective contributes three assumptions that help to better understand the (non)diffusion of sustainability-oriented user innovations: (1) innovation diffusion is a multi-level and -actor phenomenon; (2) an actor-to-actor orientation integrates user innovators into the ecosystem; (3) the service perspective defines innovation diffusion as an evolving co-created process. The assumptions are translated into policy implications and future research requirements for moving towards an innovation infrastructure that considers the role and contribution of users in sustainable innovation.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2020.01.011 [Google]

 

Jacob, I., M. Khanna and K. A. Rai (2020): Attribution analysis of luxury brands: An investigation into consumer-brand congruence through conspicuous consumption, Journal of Business Research, 116(), pp.597-607

Brands and their personalities constitute the basis upon which consumers identify and bond with various products or services. This study focuses on the factors influencing congruity between consumers’ self-image and brand image for luxury brands in transitional economies like India. This study empirically evaluates a hypothesized theoretical framework in order to identify and understand the following key variables in each factor of consumer-brand congruence in the luxury brand category: brand perception, brand expectation, dimensions of brand image (mystery, sensuality, and intimacy), brand love, and brand respect. This study also discusses how the brand image dimensions relate to brand love and brand respect. A structural model is developed to analyze the relationship between these factors. The findings establish the relationship between consumers and brands through various attributes of luxury brand image and consumer self-image.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2019.07.007 [Google]

 

Thomsen, T. U., J. Holmqvist, S. von Wallpach, A. Hemetsberger and R. W. Belk (2020): Conceptualizing unconventional luxury, Journal of Business Research, 116(), pp.441-445

How is luxury conceived in a modern and changing world? While luxury is a well-researched area in the domain of consumer goods, research on more consumer-focused forms of luxury is still nascent. Yet today luxury experiences drive the development of luxury markets and inconspicuous, private consumption of luxury is rising. In order to address these developments, this special issue moves beyond conventional understandings of luxury as involving conspicuous status consumption of tangible goods, and focuses instead on how consumers may experience, give, produce, or share luxury, and what luxuriousness implies. The various articles in the special issue addresses topics such as intangible services, hedonic escapes, and everyday pleasures. They also include alternative understandings of exclusivity, and of common goods that have become scarce over time. Together, the articles in the special issue combine to present a broader understanding both of what luxury can be and of what luxury might do for consumers. While previous conventional luxury understanding focus on exclusive status consumption, the different articles in this special issue instead introduce consumer perceptions of luxury for which conventional luxury attributes look markedly or even entirely different.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbusres.2020.01.058 [Google]

 

Rust, R. T. (2020): Outside-in marketing: Why, when and how?, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.102-104

We explore the nature and evolution of outside-in marketing. Outside-in is the marketing view of strategy, with inside-out being the traditional view. We show how outside-in and inside-out clash culturally, and trade off strategically, especially in service. Technological advances in communications and information technology have enabled closer relationships with customers, and “big data” for managing those relationships. The marketing function is important for managing outside-in, because market orientation alone is insufficient. Outside-in management is most effective for focusing on customer satisfaction and revenue, since insights about customer needs and wants tend to move bottom-up through the organization. Taken to its logical conclusion, outside-in implies replacing inside-out, product-focused management (e.g., brand managers) with outside-in, customer-focused management (e.g., customer managers). Customer-focused, future-oriented metrics (e.g., customer satisfaction, customer lifetime value, customer equity) increasingly grab attention away from aggregate, short-term metrics (e.g., product sales). Long-term impact from customer-relevant issues such as discrimination plays out over time, and must be researched using longitudinal methods. Eventually, even the meaning of “outside” will change, as computers increasingly become the customer. • Strategy does not always emanate from firm capabilities. Reacting to the needs and wants of the firm’s customers provides an alternative strategic viewpoint that is likely to be more effective when the goal is revenue. • Using aggregate summary statistics to describe the market is increasingly obsolete. Instead, smart firms focus on collecting and analyzing data about individual customers (“big data”). • Outside-in works best for programs to increase customer satisfaction, retention and sales. Inside-out works best for programs to standardize internal processes and increase efficiency.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2019.12.003 [Google]

 

Babu, M. M., B. L. Dey, M. Rahman, S. K. Roy, S. F. Syed Alwi and M. M. Kamal (2020): Value co-creation through social innovation: A study of sustainable strategic alliance in telecommunication and financial services sectors in Bangladesh, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.13-27

The formulation of strategic alliance by commercial, social and government organizations has potential to simultaneously achieve market related success and develop solution to social problems. Social innovation that leads to positive changes in society by providing solutions to social and environmental challenges may also require strategic collaboration by multiple organizations. Despite recent scholarly interest in social innovation, there is scant empirical evidence on the underlying drivers of network-based sustainable strategic relationships that co-create value. Moreover, further academic research on multi-stakeholder engagement to develop collaborative and strategic alliance-led social innovation can advance relevant scholarships. This study addresses these issues by analysing value co-creation through sustainable strategic alliance amongst commercial and not-for-profit organizations in Bangladesh. The research adopts qualitative method in the form of in-depth interviews from thirty-four senior management of commercial and not-for-profit organizations and industry experts in Bangladesh. Findings highlight the underlying drivers of strategic alliance that lead to value co-creation for concerned parties. The findings also suggest that strategic alliance constitutes service-ecosystem that facilitates emergence, engagement and evolution of social innovation that eventually drives value co-creation through sustained and successful social innovation. As such, the paper contributes to relevant literature and offers useful insights for practitioners and policy makers. • Explored the underlying motivations of multi-stakeholder engagement with a pursuit for collaborative strategic alliance-led social innovation. • Findings introduce a new dimension to value co-creation that is characterised and defined by the contribution of social innovation. • Several macro environmental factors play a key role for formation, continuation and success of strategic alliance. • Strategic alliance drives value co-creation by constituting service-ecosystem that facilitates sustained social innovation.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2020.06.003 [Google]

 

Dayan, M. and N. O. Ndubisi (2020): B2B service innovation and global industrial service management, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.140-142

This special edition of IMM aims to develop knowledge and generate new insights and applications of service innovation in B2B context, and global industrial services management relevant to scholars and managers. This article briefly discusses the theme of the special issue, the compelling rationale for putting together the body of scholarship around the topic, and brief introduction of the articles featured in the issue, and their contributions to industrial marketing/B2B discourse. It also highlights some key future research directions. • Editorial to the special edition of IMM on B2B service innovation and global industrial services management • Brief introduction of the articles featured in the issue • Highlights some key future research directions.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2019.08.006 [Google]

 

Dai, J., W. Che, J. J. Lim and Y. Shou (2020): Service innovation of cold chain logistics service providers: A multiple-case study in China, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.143-156

This exploratory study investigates how cold chain logistics service providers (LSPs) in emerging markets gain competitive advantage through service innovation, and how state ownership and regulatory pressure influence their innovation practices. By applying a multiple-case study research design, this study examines service innovation in four leading cold chain LSPs in China. For each case, specific service innovation practices are documented and coded according to the service innovation framework adapted from previous research. The results show that service innovation is indeed important impetus for cold chain LSPs’ superior competitiveness, even though previous research suggested that firms in this industry are not as innovative as others. Cold chain LSPs in emerging markets tend to innovate in providing new value-added and differential service offerings to specific customers, industries or regions. Cross-case analysis also reveals that high state-owned share and regulatory pressure may limit LSPs’ capability for investing service innovation and developing novel business models. • Service innovation helps cold chain LSPs gain competitive advantages. • Cold chain LSPs in emerging markets innovate to provide differential service offerings. • State ownership and regulatory pressure may restrain LSPs’ capability for service innovation.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2019.08.002 [Google]

 

Casidy, R., M. Nyadzayo and M. Mohan (2020): Service innovation and adoption in industrial markets: An SME perspective, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.157-170

Service innovation is essential, particularly for companies operating in highly competitive environments, as it can lead to innovation adoption behaviors, which in turn influence overall business performance. Drawing upon the innovation adoption and relationship marketing literature, and grounded within the structure-conduct-performance paradigm and social exchange theory, this study examines the reputational and relational mechanisms through which service innovation influences the innovation adoption decisions of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs). A survey of 336 Australian SME representatives reveals the critical role of suppliers’ sustainable competitive advantage (SCA) and affective commitment in mediating the relationship between service innovation and innovation adoption behavior. However, industry-relevant moderators in the form of technological turbulence and long-term orientation constrain the mediating effects. Specifically, perceived SCA has stronger mediating effects among short-term-oriented customers, whereas affective commitment has stronger mediating effects when technological turbulence is low. The findings provide useful insights for organizations in terms of capitalizing on their reputation and relationship with customers to encourage the adoption of innovation by SMEs. • Service innovativeness affects adoption via reputational and relational factors. • Perceived SCA has stronger mediating effects among short-term oriented customers. • Affective commitment has stronger mediating effects in low technological turbulence.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2019.06.008 [Google]

 

Weerawardena, J., S. Salunke, G. Knight, G. S. Mort and P. W. Liesch (2020): The learning subsystem interplay in service innovation in born global service firm internationalization, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.181-195

We examine the role of learning firm-specific advantages of small and medium size (SME) service firms in their internationalization. We focus on technical services that have received limited scholarly attention. We theorize that innovative born global firms build a set of capabilities in market, internal and relational learning that will provide new knowledge configurations to undertake technical and administrative innovations. Adopting an organizational sub-system view, we posit that market learning drives other learning capabilities in the firm to contribute collectively to innovation, and in turn, international market outcomes. The findings of our study of US born global SMEs support this theorization. Market-learning capability operates in a complex set of relationships with other learning capabilities in its contribution to innovation. Interestingly, relative to technical innovation, administrative innovation makes a prominent contribution to international market outcomes. We discuss implications of our findings for theory and practice and provide future research directions. • Examines role of learning capabilities in service innovation-led early internationalization of born global service firms • Market learning operates in a complex relationship with other learning capabilities in service innovation • Technical (product, process) service innovation drives and administrative (managerial, marketing) service innovation • While technical innovation is essential, administrative innovation is equally needed in service internationalization.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2019.05.012 [Google]

 

Ndubisi, N. O., M. Dayan, V. Yeniaras and M. Al-hawari (2020): The effects of complementarity of knowledge and capabilities on joint innovation capabilities and service innovation: The role of competitive intensity and demand uncertainty, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.196-208

Service innovation has become increasingly important for the growth of developed and developing countries. Despite an extensive body of literature on the role of joint innovation capabilities in improving a firm’s innovativeness, the multivariate influences of operant resources and joint innovation capabilities, as well as the interplay among these in the prediction of service innovation have not been scrutinized in the context of B2B SMEs in a developing country. This study aims to fill this gap by testing a model that shows the relationships among complementarity of knowledge and capabilities as operant resources, joint innovation capabilities, and service innovation. We derive hypotheses about these relationships and test them using data from a sample of 302 respondents from 151 firms operating in the UAE. The results show that the relationships between complementarity of knowledge and joint innovation capabilities, and between joint innovation capabilities and service innovation, are significant and positive. They also show that the mediation effect of joint innovation capabilities on the relationship between complementarity of knowledge and service innovation is positive and full. This study also tests the moderating roles of competitive intensity and demand uncertainty in the relationship between joint innovative capabilities and service innovation and finds that their connection is stronger when competitive intensity is high. • Knowledge complementarity helps develop joint innovation capabilities. • However, complementarity of capabilities has no such effect. • Joint innovation capabilities can create superior service innovation. • Competition enhances the effect of joint innovation capabilities on service innovation. • Joint innovation capability in emergent markets rely more on knowledge complementarity.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2019.05.011 [Google]

 

Acharya, C., D. Ojha, P. C. Patel and R. Gokhale (2020): Modular interconnected processes, fluid partnering, and innovation speed: A loosely coupled systems perspective on B2B service supply chain management, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.209-219

In this paper, we examine whether and how loosely coupled systems in service supply chains influence the speed of innovation in service organizations. Drawing upon the nomological network of loosely coupled systems, we propose a way for supply chains in the business to business (B2B) market context to be conceptualized as loosely coupled systems and explain how the dialectical elements of modularity at the interface of standard process and content interfaces (SPCI) and structured data connectivity (SDC) enable the sharing of high-quality information through fluid partnership in service supply chains to improve innovation speed. Results that are based on a sample of service firms indicate that SPCI and SDC are positively associated with modular interconnected processes, and they, in turn, positively influence the ability to reconfigure supply chain partners (fluid partnership). Fluid partnership enhances information quality, which in turn, influences innovation speed. Implications are discussed for B2B service supply chain efforts in improving innovation speed. • Standardization and structure in service systems enable process modularity • Process modularity improves the ability to change supply chain partners • Ability to change partners and process modularity improve information quality • Ability to change partners and information quality increase innovation speed

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2019.05.007 [Google]

 

Paiola, M. and H. Gebauer (2020): Internet of things technologies, digital servitization and business model innovation in BtoB manufacturing firms, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.245-264

Technologies like the Internet of Things (IoT) are offering new opportunities and posing serious challenges to firms, forcing them to create entirely new business models, migrating from the conventional product-centric approaches to (digitally-based) service-oriented ones. This paper – following a qualitative research method – aims at describing the service-oriented impact of IoT technologies on firms’ business models, with a particular focus on opportunities and challenges for BtoB manufacturing firms. Being the impact of IoT technologies on businesses a quite recent research stream, to date scarce attention has been devoted to the topic with specific attention to its impact on service-oriented business models in manufacturing firms. The paper contributes in this research stream in different ways. It proposes a map of digital servitization that helps in understanding firms’ strategic transitions caused by technologies, making both theoretical and managerial contributions. Firstly, the research underlines the impact of the firms’ sales model as a strategic factor in shaping firms’ digital servitization strategies. In addition, three progressive levels of digital servitization complexity are identified, namely product- process- and outcome-oriented, that are based on an increasing use of IOT technologies and have specific challenges and opportunities. • Following a qualitative research method, the paper aims at describing the impact of IOT technologies on firms’ business models service-orientation (digital servitization). • It focuses on challenges and opportunities of digital servitization for BtoB manufacturing firms. • The paper proposed a map of digital servitization that helps in understanding the strategic transitions caused by IOT technologies, making both theoretical and managerial contributions • The research helps focusing attention on the impact of the firms’ sales model as a strategic factor in shaping firms’ digital servitization strategies • Three levels of digital servitization business models are identified; they imply specific challenges and opportunities and are based on an increasing use of IOT technologies.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2020.03.009 [Google]

 

Paschou, T., M. Rapaccini, F. Adrodegari and N. Saccani (2020): Digital servitization in manufacturing: A systematic literature review and research agenda, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.278-292

This paper addresses how servitization is facilitated by the adoption of digital technologies and presents a review of the literature on this subject. The paper aims to characterise the phenomenon of ‘digital servitization’ by examining how the literature describes the convergence between servitization and digital technologies as well as to identify areas for future research developments. The systematic review of the available scientific literature revealed limited but rapidly growing coverage of the phenomenon by scientific studies, which have mainly focused on the role of a few digital technologies (above all, the Internet of Things), studied in isolation. The research has mainly adopted an empirical, case-based methodological approach, mostly investigating the industrial equipment, automotive, and IT industries and focusing on the role of digital technologies for the implementation of intermediate and advanced services. This picture calls for future research endeavours to extend the scope of investigation into digital servitization (regarding the technologies covered and their combinatory effect, the potential benefits, and the application domains) and to develop models and frameworks to support decision-making by practitioners. • This systematic literature review provides an understanding of the phenomenon of digital servitization. • Digital servitization can be conceptualised as the development of new services and/or the improvement of existing ones through digital technologies. • Research on digital servitization is in a nascent, fast-growing stage, however with a knowledge stock fragmented across different fields. • Limited research addresses the cumulative effect of technologies on digital servitization. • Numerous gaps and avenues for future research on this topic emerge from this review.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2020.02.012 [Google]

 

Tronvoll, B., A. Sklyar, D. Sörhammar and C. Kowalkowski (2020): Transformational shifts through digital servitization, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.293-305

Manufacturers increasingly look to digitalization to drive service growth. However, success is far from guaranteed, and many firms focus too much on technology. Adopting a discovery-oriented, theories-in-use approach, this study examines the strategic organizational shifts that underpin digital servitization. Notwithstanding strong managerial and academic interest, this link between digitalization and servitization is still under-investigated. Depth interviews with senior executives and managers from a global market leader revealed that to achieve digital service-led growth, a firm and its network need to make three interconnected shifts: (1) from planning to discovery, (2) from scarcity to abundance, and (3) from hierarchy to partnership. Organizational identity, dematerialization, and collaboration play a key role in this transformation. For managers, the study identifies a comprehensive set of strategic change initiatives needed to ensure successful digital servitization. • Three strategic organizational shifts are needed for digital servitization success. • The key role of organizational identity, dematerialization, and collaboration • Digital servitization requires changes within both the firm and its entire network. • New business models centered around big data are driving competitive advantage. • Agile mindset and ways of working are imperative for digital servitization.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2020.02.005 [Google]

 

Kamalaldin, A., L. Linde, D. Sjödin and V. Parida (2020): Transforming provider-customer relationships in digital servitization: A relational view on digitalization, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.306-325

Digitalization is viewed as a source of future competitiveness due to its potential for unlocking new value-creation and revenue-generation opportunities. To profit from digitalization, providers and customers tend to move away from transactional product-centric model to relational service-oriented engagement. This relational transformation is brought about through digital servitization. However, current knowledge about how providers and customers transform their relationship to achieve benefits from digital servitization is lacking. This paper addresses that knowledge gap by applying the relational view theory to a study of four provider-customer relationships engaged in digital servitization. The results provide evidence for four relational components – complementary digitalization capabilities, relation-specific digital assets, digitally enabled knowledge-sharing routines, and partnership governance – that enable providers and customers to profit from digital servitization. A key contribution is the development of a relational transformation framework for digital servitization that provides an overview of how the four relational components evolve as the relationship progresses. In doing so, we contribute to the emerging servitization literature by offering key relational insights into the interdependence of activities throughout the transformation phases of provider-customer relationships in digital servitization. • Complementary digitalization capabilities are key for initiating and preserving a relationship. • Partners invest in relation-specific digital assets to align technologies and develop competence. • Digitally enabled knowledge-sharing routines enhance transparency and utilization of data. • Partnership governance transform to a relational approach to exploit digitalization potential. • We present a relational transformation framework for digital servitization to guide B2B relations.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2020.02.004 [Google]

 

Wang, Y., F. Jia, T. Schoenherr, Y. Gong and L. Chen (2020): Cross-border e-commerce firms as supply chain integrators: The management of three flows, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.72-88

Cross-border e-commerce is becoming increasingly popular around the world. With the development of technology, competition has gradually shifted from commodity-based attributes, such as cost and quality, to a supply chain’s service capacity for e-commerce. Within this context, the present paper delineates how cross-border e-commerce firms can generate supply chain service capabilities that yield improvements in supply chain relationship quality to e-tailors and other platform users. Insights are derived through data collected via a multiple case study approach based on four Chinese cross-border e-commerce enterprises (OSell, Zongteng, BizArk and Linca); data were collected from 41 semi-structured interviews, field visits and secondary data. Relying on the service-dominant logic as the theoretical foundation, we identify three supply chain resources (flows related to information, logistics and finance) and their interplay as being critical for the development of supply chain service capabilities, which in turn lead to an improvement in the quality of supply chain relationships (assessed by the dimensions of trust improvement/commitment, risk mitigation, and customer satisfaction). The results offer important insights into how to best manage supply chain resources in relation to the three flows by cross-border e-commerce firms in order to foster relationship quality, an attribute that has become so critical today for competitive differentiation. • We identify information, logistics and finance flows as being critical for supply chain service capabilities • Supply chain service capabilities lead to an improvement in supply chain relationship quality • We offer insights into how to best manage relationships by cross-border e-commerce firms to foster relationship quality

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2019.09.004 [Google]

 

Liu, H., L. Purvis, R. Mason and P. Wells (2020): Developing logistics value propositions: Drawing Insights from a distributed manufacturing solution, Industrial Marketing Management, 89(), pp.517-527

With a focus on supply chains as ecosystems of service exchange, our paper aims to explore how value propositions are developed and evolve via combinations of service innovation. A single longitudinal case study is presented. The units of analysis are different projects along a logistics service provider (LSP)’s innovation journey. The study explores how the case company identified innovation in logistics as a gap and developed a distributed manufacturing strategy with a unique business model involving a reallocation of production functions across a global supply network. Our contribution is two-fold. In terms of theory, we adopt a service-dominant logic perspective to investigate how companies’ value propositions evolve over time. In terms of managerial contributions, our paper provides insights into how service providers can strategically integrate their resources with service ecosystem partners to provide competitive business propositions. • A service ecosystems perspective on logistics innovations. • A longitudinal case study of a global logistics provider. • A proactive innovation strategy influences on customers’ value creation processes.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.indmarman.2020.03.011 [Google]

 

Comments

comments