Considered Service-specific journals were Journal of Service Research, Journal of Service Management, Journal of Services Marketing, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, Service Industries Journal, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, and Service Science.

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Lu Vinh, N., J. Wirtz, H. Kunz Werner, S. Paluch, T. Gruber, A. Martins and G. Patterson Paul (2020): Service robots, customers and service employees: what can we learn from the academic literature and where are the gaps?, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 30(3), pp.361-391

Purpose Robots are predicted to have a profound impact on the service sector. The emergence of robots has attracted increasing interest from business scholars and practitioners alike. In this article, we undertake a systematic review of the business literature about the impact of service robots on customers and employees with the objective of guiding future research.Design/methodology/approach We analyzed the literature on service robots as they relate to customers and employees in business journals listed in the Financial Times top 50 journals plus all journals covered in the cross-disciplinary SERVSIG literature alerts.Findings The analysis of the identified studies yielded multiple observations about the impact of service robots on customers (e.g. overarching frameworks on acceptance and usage of service robots; characteristics of service robots and anthropomorphism; and potential for enhanced and deteriorated service experiences) and service employees (e.g. employee benefits such as reduced routine work, enhanced productivity and job satisfaction; potential negative consequences such as loss of autonomy and a range of negative psychological outcomes; opportunities for human–robot collaboration; job insecurity; and robot-related up-skilling and development requirements). We also conclude that current research on service robots is fragmented, is largely conceptual in nature and focused on the initial adoption stage. We feel that more research is needed to build an overarching theory. In addition, more empirical research is needed, especially on the long(er)-term usage service robots on actual behaviors, the well-being and potential downsides and (ethical) risks for customers and service employees.Research limitations/implications Our review focused on the business and service literature. Future work may want to include additional literature streams, including those in computer science, engineering and information systems.Originality/value This article is the first to synthesize the business and service literature on the impact of service robots on customers and employees.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-04-2019-0088 [Google]

 

Lu, L., G. Gregory and S. Thelen (2020): Influence of country of origin and type of information exchanged on consequences of offshore service sentiment, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 30(3), pp.233-255

Purpose This research extends existing services offshoring literature by investigating how the type of information exchanged, technical support or personal billing, in conjunction with country-of-service-origin (COSO) influences consumer likelihood to react negatively (boycott issue importance, NWOM, perceived service quality) to an offshore service exchange.Design/methodology/approach Structural equations modelling is employed to assess relationships among constructs when country of service origin (New Zealand and the Philippines) and type of service provided (technical support and personal billing services) are varied. Using a scenario-based experimental design we collected 337 responses from a consumer panel across Australia.Findings Results indicate that both COSO and type of information exchanged affect service sentiment. Overall, consumers feel more negative and more likely to punish a company for offshoring to culturally dissimilar countries such as the Philippines than to culturally similar ones such as New Zealand. However, consumers were more concerned with personal billing services provided from offshore providers than technical support, regardless of COSO.Practical implications Practitioners need to understand customer sentiment about services offshoring in general as well as the relationship between service type and country of service origin when designing the global service supply chain.Originality/value This study extends theory by applying a multi-dimensional portfolio perspective in examining customer sentiment of offshore services. Understanding the underlying bases of customer concerns and how companies can mitigate negative perceptions allows firms to better manage service offshore strategy.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-02-2019-0045 [Google]

 

Choi, B. and S. Kim Hyun (2020): Customer-to-customer interaction quality, promotion emotion, prevention emotion and attitudinal loyalty in mass services, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 30(3), pp.257-276

Purpose The current study aims to explore the relationships between three kinds of customer-to-customer (C2C) interaction quality and brand loyalty via customer promotion and prevention emotions.Design/methodology/approach In order to test the model, we gathered self-administered data through an online survey. The relationships were examined using structural equation modelling (SEM).Findings The findings show that the influence of customer-to-customer interaction quality on promotion/prevention emotion varies: friend-interaction quality evokes both promotion emotion (high-arousal feelings) and prevention emotion (low-arousal feelings), whereas neighbouring customer-interaction quality elicits promotion emotion, and audience-interaction quality elicits prevention emotion. Moreover, the findings show that enhancing both promotion and prevention emotions is crucial to improve customer attitudinal loyalty in mass service settings, and the strength of the link from promotion emotion to attitudinal loyalty is stronger than that from prevention emotion.Practical implications The authors suggest that marketers should focus on facilitating effective friend- and neighbouring customer-interaction to enhance promotion emotion.Originality/value The paper contributes to a stream of research on customer-to-customer interaction by exploring the relative influences of three kinds of customer-to-customer interaction quality on customer attitudinal loyalty via post-consumption emotions.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-08-2019-0172 [Google]

 

Virlée Justine, B., W. Hammedi and C. R. van Riel Allard (2020): Healthcare service users as resource integrators: investigating factors influencing the co-creation of value at individual, dyadic and systemic levels, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 30(3), pp.277-306

Purpose Patients, when using healthcare services, (co)create value by integrating their own resources with those of a range of stakeholders. These resource integration activities, however, require different types of skills and effort from the patients, and different types of interactions with stakeholders, while also having different effects on patients’ well-being. The purpose of the present study is to develop a better understanding of why some patients are better able or willing to perform resource integration activities that impact their well-being. To reach this objective, barriers and facilitators of these activities in their interactions with various stakeholders were identified.Design/methodology/approach The study uses a multiple case study design. Individual patients having received a lung transplant, together with their entourage (family, medical professionals, other patients) each represent a case. In-depth interviews were conducted with the patients and with various categories of stakeholders in their service delivery network who were relevant to their experience and with whom they integrated their resources.Findings The study identifies three levels on which barriers and facilitators of the resource integration process occur: the individual, relational and systemic level. Factors on these levels affect different aspects of the process.Originality/value This study takes a systems perspective and investigates how various systemic factors and stakeholders conduce or inhibit healthcare service users to perform resource integration activities, especially focusing on those activities that strongly affect their well-being.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-07-2019-0154 [Google]

 

Gonçalves Fábio, M. R. R., J. F. Cândido Carlos and L. Feliciano Isabel Maria Pereira (2020): Inertia, group conformity and customer loyalty in healthcare in the information age, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 30(3), pp.307-330

Purpose The purpose is to analyse the influence of inertia and group conformity on loyalty in healthcare.Design/methodology/approach Structural equation model developed from the literature and tested with cross-sectional data from a patient online survey.Findings Inertia is a significant antecedent of loyalty and has a stronger effect in healthcare than in other service sectors. Group conformity has no significant effect in healthcare.Research Implications The strength of the impact of inertia [group conformity] on loyalty depends on the importance of the customer need that the service industry satisfies, in Maslow’s hierarchy of needs. Where inertia (stability need) is equally or more [less] important than the customer need, the influence of inertia on loyalty should be positive and strong [weak or insignificant]. In services that satisfy needs more [equally or less] important than group conformity (belonging need), there may be an insignificant [significant] influence of group conformity on customer loyalty, even [especially] in credence services.Practical implications Healthcare providers can exploit the stronger effect of inertia in healthcare through development of inertia-based loyalty policies. Regulatory authorities should be vigilant to ensure that these policies are not detrimental to patients. ‘Inert’ patients must become responsible for assessing their loyalties. Authorities and reference groups must stimulate customer loyalty assessments, and assist by providing impartial information.Originality/value This is the first study to address the influence of inertia and group conformity on loyalty in the healthcare sector and, from the perspective of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs, it is the first to do so in any service sector.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-08-2019-0184 [Google]

 

McGraw, J., R. Russell-Bennett and M. White Katherine (2019): Tough but not terrific: value destruction in men’s health, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 30(3), pp.331-359

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of masculine identity in generating value destruction and diminished well-being in a preventative health service.Design/methodology/approach This research used five focus groups with 39 Australian men aged between 50 and 74 years. Men’s participation in the National Bowel Cancer Screening Program informed the sample frame. In total, 12 Jungian male archetypes were used to identify different masculine identities.Findings Thematic analysis of the data revealed three themes of masculinity that explain why men destroy value by avoiding the use of a preventative health services including: rejection of the service reduces consumer disempowerment and emasculation, active rejection of resources creates positive agency and suppressing negative self-conscious emotions protects the self.Research limitations/implications Limitations include the single context of bowel cancer screening. Future research could investigate value destruction in other preventative health contexts such as testicular cancer screening, sexual health screening and drug abuse.Practical implications Practical implications include fostering consumer empowerment when accessing services, developing consumer resources to create positive agency and boosting positive self-conscious emotions by promoting positive social norms.Originality/value This research is the first known study to explore how value is destroyed in men’s preventative health using the perspective of gender identity. This research also is the first to explore value destruction as an emotion regulation strategy.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-03-2019-0065 [Google]

 

Schepers, J. J. L. and M. van der Borgh (2020): A Meta-Analysis of Frontline Employees’ Role Behavior and the Moderating Effects of National Culture, Journal of Service Research, 23(3), pp.255-280

Many empirical studies have focused on understanding the frontline role process, which reflects the chain of effects including the antecedents and outcomes of frontline employees’ in-role behavior and extra-role behavior. A close examination of past findings reveals discrepancies across cultures. This meta-analysis provides insights into the moderating effects of national culture on the frontline role process. We build on role theory to consolidate role behavior’s antecedents to reflect the expectations emanating from four stakeholders of the frontline role: the organization, manager, peers, and customers. We formulate hypotheses on the moderating effects of national culture dimensions (i.e., power distance, individualism, masculinity, and uncertainty avoidance) and meta-analyze 105 articles, including 100 independent samples with 32,364 participants from 35 different countries, to test our predictions. The results show that customer expectations are the strongest antecedent to both in-role and extra-role behavior and furthermore confirm that the frontline role process differs across cultures. We offer managers advice on how to adapt expectations for sales and service employees across countries to enhance frontline performance evaluations, customer satisfaction, and ultimately the firm’s competitiveness. We also link our results to new frontline trends (e.g., service robots, artificial intelligence, remote service technology) and provide a future research agenda.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670520918669 [Google]

 

Wittkowski, K., J. F. Klein, T. Falk, J. J. L. Schepers, J. Aspara and K. N. Bergner (2020): What Gets Measured Gets Done: Can Self-Tracking Technologies Enhance Advice Compliance?, Journal of Service Research, 23(3), pp.281-298

Self-tracking technologies (STTs) in the form of smart devices and mobile applications enable consumers to monitor, analyze, and interpret personal performance data on health and physical or financial well-being. As a result of self-tracking, consumers are not only expected to check their personal performance more actively but also to implement service professionals’ advice to improve their well-being more accurately. Despite the growing popularity of STTs, empirical evidence on the extent to which STT use enhances advice compliance remains scant. A field experiment with 538 participants in a health-care setting suggests that STT use does not increase advice compliance per se. Rather, the effectiveness of STTs depends on consumers’ self-efficacy. For consumers low in self-efficacy, STT use can even undermine advice compliance. A lab experiment with 831 participants replicates and generalizes the findings to a nonmedical professional service (i.e., fitness training). As assessments of self-efficacy might be difficult in practice, service providers in health care can use consumers’ body mass index as an easy-to-measure proxy to predict STT effectiveness. Finally, the lab experiment also identifies perceived empowerment and personalization as psychological mechanisms mediating the influence of STT use on advice compliance.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670520904424 [Google]

 

Menguc, B., S. Auh and F. Wang (2020): Customer Participation Variation and Its Impact on Customer Service Performance: Underlying Process and Boundary Conditions, Journal of Service Research, 23(3), pp.299-320

Drawing on the customer participation (CP) literature, this research proposes that CP variation is the degree to which employees perceive variability across customers with regard to customers sharing information, time, and effort and making suggestions to enhance the service delivery process and outcome. Drawing on the job demands–resources model, this research explicates the mediating process by which CP variation affects customer service performance and its boundary conditions. Study 1 uses data from a field study in the banking industry to show that CP variation negatively influences customer service performance through greater customer-related burnout. The authors show that this mediation process is moderated by contingencies that mitigate or exacerbate the indirect relationship. Study 2 further validates the CP variation construct by testing for discriminant validity against similar and related constructs, such as CP quality, in more diverse service industries (insurance, legal consulting, travel and tourism, health care, and physical fitness). Finally, an examination of the moderating role of CP quality provides a more nuanced picture of the intricacies between CP variation and CP quality. This article concludes with a discussion of the theoretical and practical implications for CP variation research.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670519899161 [Google]

 

Skiera, B., C. Schlereth and S. Oetzel (2020): Pricing Metrics and the Importance of Minimum and Billing Increments, Journal of Service Research, 23(3), pp.321-336

Service providers often use minimum increments and billing increments to charge for higher usage than customers’ true usage. Despite their popularity in business practice, research has largely ignored these increments and assumed that charged usage always equals true usage. We develop an overcharging index that represents the extent to which a customer is charged for units that she or he did not use and identify situations in which the overcharging index is particularly high. In three empirical studies in the highly competitive telecommunication market, we demonstrate that providers are increasingly using longer minimum and billing increments. These increments yield an average overcharge of true usage of 43.79% for customers with long increments. These increments generate additional revenues that are responsible for almost two thirds (66.2%) of the operating profits of the main providers in Germany and the United States. Customers, particularly those who are less educated, seem to not understand minimum and billing increments well, do not adjust their behavior to different increments, and often make tariff choice errors unsystematically.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670519895581 [Google]

 

Stakhovych, S. and A. Tamaddoni (2020): Mix&Match: A Resource-Based Complaint Recovery Framework for Tangible Compensation, Journal of Service Research, 23(3), pp.337-352

Resource exchange theory suggests service recovery compensation is optimal when it is commensurate with what was lost (e.g., refund for overcharging). However, in practice, companies cannot always follow the theory-driven prescriptions, and the complaint recovery literature remains silent on how to best recover in such suboptimal situations. This study takes a resource-based theory stance to propose Mix&Match, a complaint recovery framework for tangible compensation offers (refunds, redeliveries, or credits) to optimize customer retention and lifetime value in both optimal and suboptimal complaint recovery scenarios. We find that matching tangible compensation with the complaint cause (e.g., redelivery for expired products) is the most effective recovery response for improving customer retention and lifetime value. However, in suboptimal nonmatching scenarios, monetary compensation in the form of store credit proves to be the most effective response.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670519898521 [Google]

 

Zhou, Y., B. Tian, T. Mo and Z. Fei (2020): Consumers Complain More Fiercely Through Small-Screen Devices: The Role of Spatial Crowding Perception, Journal of Service Research, 23(3), pp.353-367

Previous research has mainly focused on the determinants of consumers’ complaint channel choices. Little attention has been paid to the behavioral consequences of different complaint channels, particularly different complaint devices. Drawing on spatial crowding perception theory, this study finds that in an online complaint context, consumers’ complaint intensity is shaped by complaint devices that differ in screen size. Crowding perception produced by visually restrictive tension mediates the relationship between the screen size of the complaint device and the complaint intensity. The results of secondary data confirm that consumers’ complaint intensity is higher while complaining through a small-screen device (as opposed to a large-screen one). Three scenario-based experiments are conducted to examine the role of perceived spatial crowding in producing a more intense complaint behavior when complaints are submitted through smaller screen devices (as opposed to larger screen devices). The fourth experiment reveals that crowding perception can be lessened by adjusting certain design elements of the interface, ultimately mitigating the intensity of the complaint submitted through a small-screen device. Our research identifies the specific causality and underlying mechanism of the influence of device type on consumers’ postconsumption behavior, thus contributing to clarify some ambiguities in the literature.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670520904408 [Google]

 

Fritze, M. P., A. Marchand, A. B. Eisingerich and M. Benkenstein (2020): Access-Based Services as Substitutes for Material Possessions: The Role of Psychological Ownership, Journal of Service Research, 23(3), pp.368-385

Access-based services (ABS)—in which consumers do not physically own material goods but gain access to services by registering with the provider—have risen in popularity as an alternative to individual ownership and conventional consumption. Yet companies still face key challenges in promoting these services. Prior research indicates that consumers assign significant importance to their material possessions; the current study investigates how psychological ownership, the mental state of perceiving something as one’s own, attained through ABS might lead customers to increase their service use and forgo material ownership. With four studies, using cross-sectional, longitudinal, and experimental data, as well as combined self-reports with usage data, we theorize and demonstrate this effect. Firms that offer ABS can increase customers’ service psychological ownership, which acts as a psychological substitute for physical ownership and increases ABS use. The results suggest ways managers can leverage the psychological power of ownership feelings, rather than try to fight the lack of actual ownership, in access-based consumption contexts.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670520907691 [Google]

 

O’Neill, J. W. and Y. Ouyang (2020): Predicting Lodging Demand Trends in the U.S. Hotel Industry, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 61(3), pp.237-254

Future economic trends in the U.S. hotel industry are often discussed and debated at hotel investment conferences and elsewhere, typically without discussion of the underlying economic indicators that lodging prognosticators should track to predict lodging demand growth and decline. This research endeavors to rank the predictive ability of various economic variables and determine which may be the strongest predictors of lodging demand trends. In addition, we seek to identify a relatively small group of economic variables, that is, a consideration set that may best serve lodging prognosticators with determining the future direction of lodging demand. In our analyses, we evaluate both economic indicators and quarterly change in those indicators. Furthermore, we analyze autoregressive and moving average features of lodging demand in recent years. We present models that prognosticators may use to project lodging demand trends. Although there are a variety of variables that serve to predict lodging demand trends, gross domestic private investment (GDPI) is noted as a particularly effective predictor of lodging demand trends, and it has been effective over all the recent time periods we studied. This information should be beneficial to lodging practitioners/analysts as well as academics.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965520916443 [Google]

 

Cho, M., M. A. Bonn and J. Li (2020): Examining Risk-Reduction Behavior Toward Water Quality Among Restaurant Guests, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 61(3), pp.255-270

Globally, there is a growing concern about health threats from water pollution and its effects upon products used in the restaurant food preparation process. Thus, the use of contaminated water for commercial food preparation represents a high source of risk for disease-causing illnesses upon human health in both developed and developing countries. Using the Protection Motivation Theory, a convenience sampling of n = 506 Chinese residents and visitors, defined as non-Chinese residents born and socialized in cultures outside of China, who dined in restaurants within a major Chinese metropolitan area, were used to determine how guests responded to perceived threats of consuming contaminated food products used for menu items tainted by impure tap water during the food and beverage preparation process. Perceived water quality concerns were found to manifest a fear appeal that initiated two protection motivation dimensions representing threat appraisal (severity and vulnerability) and coping appraisal (response-efficacy and self-efficacy), with severity and self-efficacy receiving the highest perceptual concerns. Results documented that when restaurant guests perceived a high level of self-efficacy, they were more likely to dine out regardless of perceived risks about unsafe restaurant water quality issues. All relationships involving threat and coping appraisal, and risk-reduction behavior toward dining out were significantly different between restaurant guests representing Chinese residents and non-Chinese residents. Findings revealed that threat appraisal upon risk-reduction behavior toward dining out were positively stronger for non-Chinese residents.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965520919106 [Google]

 

Yang, F. X. (2020): Subordinate–Supervisor Friendship in Cyberspace: A Typological and Comparative Analysis of Hotel Employees, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 61(3), pp.271-286

Individuals’ social and professional arenas entangle so easily today with the rise of social networking sites (SNS). Drawing upon the boundary and social exchange theories, this study investigates whether supervisor–subordinate interactions in cyberspace will spill over to the workplace. A two-dimensional typology of hotel employees is delineated on the basis of their SNS interaction behaviors. The moderating effect of individual type is also investigated. The results indicate that supervisor–subordinate SNS interactions could transition to favorable leader–member exchanges in the workplace that, in turn, promote employees’ organizational citizenship behaviors. In addition, the impact of SNS interaction on leader–member exchange is stronger for employees with proactive personalities and self-disclosure tendencies. This study fills the void of inadequate empirical literature on hierarchical friendship in cyberspace and advances research on the moderating effect of employee personality. Managerial implications are also discussed.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965519894246 [Google]

 

Houran, J., S. A. Hill, E. D. Haynes and U. A. Bielski (2020): Paranormal Tourism: Market Study of a Novel and Interactive Approach to Space Activation and Monetization, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 61(3), pp.287-311

We review the premise, popularity, and profitability of paranormal tourism, which involves visits to any setting or locale for the explicit purpose of encountering apparent supernatural phenomena for leisure, investigation, services, products, or conventions. This niche sector can offer an inherently engaging conceptual framework for seasonal or year-round space activation and monetization by businesses situated in specific settings or cities. On a broader level, the niche also illustrates how tourism–hospitality brands and operations can navigate and even capitalize on three paradigm shifts that have disrupted contemporary markets, that is, the mobilities, performative, and creative turns. This assertion is underscored with a case analysis of a historic site that successfully leveraged paranormal themes as part of its space reactivation and rebranding. Finally, our market study suggests that the success factors of paranormal tourism might indicate a fourth paradigm shift across the wider tourism–hospitality industry, whereby the experience economy is transforming to an enchantment economy.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965520909094 [Google]

 

Olson, E. D. and H. Ro (2020): Company Response to Negative Online Reviews: The Effects of Procedural Justice, Interactional Justice, and Social Presence, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 61(3), pp.312-331

This research investigates how potential customers evaluate a company response to negative online reviews. Integrating the literature on perceived justice in service recovery, social presence in online communications, and signaling in trust formation process, this research examines the effects of procedural justice, interactional justice, and social presence in the company’s response to negative online reviews on potential customers’ trust and purchase intentions toward a company. A 2 × 2 × 2 between-subject experimental design is utilized, and 410 participants are recruited through a consumer panels firm. Main results include the three-way interaction effect of procedural justice, interactional justice, and social presence on trust and the mediating effect of trust. Social presence exacerbates the negative effects on trust when both interactional justice and procedural justice are low in the company response. However, the social presence effect becomes small in increasing trust when both interactional justice and procedural justice are high in the company response. Trust mediates the relationship between customer perceptions of company response and purchase intentions. This research provides practical implications for hospitality companies on how to effectively respond to negative online reviews.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965519892902 [Google]

 

Guzzo, R. F., J. Abbott and J. M. Madera (2020): A Micro-Level View of CSR: A Hospitality Management Systematic Literature Review, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 61(3), pp.332-352

This study provides a systematic review of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the hospitality management literature over the last decade. In contrast to prior reviews, this article starts from a broader analysis, followed by a narrower, micro-level examination of the hospitality management literature that links CSR to customers’ and employees’ attitudes and behaviors. The findings of this review show that researchers study CSR primarily from a meso-level perspective of how CSR is developed and implemented by organizations, and how it influences financial performance. This study found that although employees have long been crucial stakeholders in service environments, hospitality researchers have only recently begun to focus on understanding the relationships between CSR and employee behaviors and attitudes. This study provides directions for future research by identifying research gaps and comparing the results of this review with those of organizational psychology and management reviews.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965519892907 [Google]

 

Roy, S. K., M. S. Balaji, G. Soutar and Y. Jiang (2020): The Antecedents and Consequences of Value Co-Creation Behaviors in a Hotel Setting: A Two-Country Study, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 61(3), pp.353-368

This study examines the antecedents and consequences of value co-creation behavior in a hospitality context. An online questionnaire with samples of hotel patrons in the United States and Australia was used to obtain data and partial least square modeling was used in the analysis. The results suggest patron fairness perception enhances trust and identification with a hotel, which encourage engagement in the value co-creation behavior. Furthermore, this behavior enhances patron well-being and respect for the hotel. The study contributes to the literature by suggesting a value co-creation behavior model in the hospitality context and empirically examining the antecedents and consequences of this behavior. The results have important implications for managers designing service encounters that can encourage hotel patrons to engage in the value co-creation behavior.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965519890572 [Google]

 

Elahi, N. S., G. Abid, B. Arya and S. Farooqi (2020): Workplace behavioral antecedents of job performance: mediating role of thriving, Service Industries Journal, 40(44147), pp.755-776

Thriving at work is a psychological state in which an employee experiences learning and vitality. Drawing on social exchange theory arguments, we examine the direct effects of two workplace behavioral antecedents on job performance. In addition, we explore the mediating influence of thriving at work on the relationship between workplace behavior and job performance. Utilizing a sample of 221 employees and their immediate supervisors, our results reveal a positive association between employee experiences of social behaviors (civility and compassion) and in-role job performance. We also find that thriving mediates this relationship. Our work highlights the importance of considering the influence of workplace behaviors in energizing employees and boosting their performance. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2019.1638369 [Google]

 

Woratschek, H., C. Horbel and B. Popp (2020): Determining customer satisfaction and loyalty from a value co-creation perspective, Service Industries Journal, 40(44147), pp.777-799

In light of the recent developments in marketing theory, namely service-dominant logic and value co-creation, the development of customer satisfaction and customer loyalty deserves reconsideration to broaden the mostly firm-centric earlier approaches. We propose a framework that includes the contributions of co-creating actors and identification with the firm as antecedents of customer satisfaction and loyalty. This framework can be adapted to a context by defining a context-specific set of actors and their unique reciprocal relationships. Two quantitative studies conducted in the professional German soccer leagues demonstrate that multiple actors (event organizer, teams, and fans) roughly show the same effect on customer satisfaction. Moreover, identification has both direct and indirect (i.e. via customer satisfaction and perceived social actors’ contributions) influence on customer loyalty. The results imply firm activities have limited influence on customer satisfaction and loyalty. As a result, managers must identify strategies to facilitate value co-creation among all relevant actors. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2019.1606213 [Google]

 

Loureiro, S. M. C., N. Stylos and F. J. Miranda (2020): Exploring how mindfulness may enhance perceived value of travel experience, Service Industries Journal, 40(44147), pp.800-824

This study aims to explore the effect of tourists’ mindfulness on the perceived value of travel experience (PVTE) through destination images (cognitive, affective, and conative) and tourist experiences. Data (n = 370) were gathered using a self-administered structured questionnaire distributed to travellers departing from Lisbon International airport towards Spain in July 2017. The results show the important role of mindfulness in shaping all dimensions of destination image. Tourist experience acts as a mediator between destination images and PVTE. However, perceived authenticity does not have a moderating, but rather a controlling effect on the relationship between tourist experience and PVTE. From a theoretical point of view, the study makes important contribution in conceptualising the influence of a tourist’s mindfulness on PVTE through destination image components and tourist experience. From a practical perspective, it offers practitioners and DMOs valuable insights into the effective design and implementation of suitable destination marketing activities. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2019.1600672 [Google]

 

Behravesh, E., C. Tanova and A. M. Abubakar (2020): Do high-performance work systems always help to retain employees or is there a dark side?, Service Industries Journal, 40(44147), pp.825-845

This study considers both the positive and possible negative impact of high-performance work systms (HPWS) by investigating its relationship with job demands, job satisfaction and job search behavior. The parallel mediation effect of job satisfaction and physiological job demand on the link between HPWS and job search behavior is also examined. Data were collected in two phases from 22 branches of Iranian private banks (n = 269) employees in 2016. Results from a covariance-based structural equation modeling (CB-SEM) shows that HPWS positively relates to job satisfaction, physiological job demand and job search behavior. Job satisfaction negatively relates to job search behavior and mediates the link between HPWS and job search behavior. The results offer practical implications for managers and policy makers in the service industry to balance between job demands – resources in workplace and provide adequate resources for their employees to buffer specific negative effects of job demands. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2019.1572748 [Google]

 

Friman, M., M. S. Rosenbaum and T. Otterbring (2020): The relationship between exchanged resources and loyalty intentions, Service Industries Journal, 40(44147), pp.846-865

This research aims to revive the applicability of the exchange concept in the marketing domain. The authors draw on current exchange theories to show how members of an aquatic center receive relational, social support, and restorative resources from other center members and employees. They then empirically demonstrate that members’ loyalty to the center is fueled by the resources they receive from others in the center and that their experience in the center mediates the relationship between exchanged resources and member loyalty. This research reveals that service organizations may foster person-place bonds by providing customers with resources over and above goods and services. Customers appreciate resources that transform their well-being, such as social support and natural, restorative resources, and they demonstrate loyalty to places where they can obtain therapeutic resources. From a theoretical standpoint, this work shows support for the notion that the exchange concept is a foundational aspect of a general theory of marketing and explains how the exchange and value concepts in marketing are linked together. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2018.1561875 [Google]

 

Denktaş-Şakar, G. and E. Sürücü (2020): Stakeholder engagement via social media: an analysis of third-party logistics companies, Service Industries Journal, 40(44147), pp.866-889

Social media helps firms establish a connection with their stakeholders by mitigating geographic and demographic barriers. Firms using social media can effectively engage in close relationships with their stakeholders. Firms must measure engagement levels to manage such fruitful relationships and develop social media strategies accordingly. Although studies have examined B2C industries’ levels of stakeholder engagement via social media, corresponding research on B2B industries has been limited. Thus, in this study, the relationship between global 3PLs and their stakeholders through social media is examined. The study is based on a content analysis of Facebook posts of 30 global 3PLs analyzed from 1 November 2017 to 31 January 2018. In this paper, original findings for 3PL firms’ social media usage are presented. The findings contribute to social media theory by showing that vivid posts and special day celebration posts strengthen relationships with stakeholders. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2018.1561874 [Google]

 

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