Considered Service-specific journals were Journal of Service Research, Journal of Service Management, Journal of Services Marketing, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, Service Industries Journal, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, and Service Science.

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Gonsalves, C., S. Ludwig, K. de Ruyter and A. Humphreys (2021): Writing for Impact in Service Research, Journal of Service Research, (), pp.1

For service researchers, contributing to academic advancement through academic publications is a raison d’être. Moreover, demand is increasing for service researchers to make a difference beyond academia. Thus, service researchers face the formidable challenge of writing in a manner that resonates with not just service academics but also practitioners, policy makers, and other stakeholders. In this article, the authors examine how service research articles’ lexical variations might influence their academic citations and public media coverage. Drawing on the complete corpus of Journal of Service Research (JSR) articles published between 1998 and 2020, they use text analytics and thereby determine that variations in language intensity, immediacy, and diversity relate to article impact. The appropriate use of these lexical variants and other stylistic conventions depends on the audience (academic or the public), the subsection of this article in which they appear (e.g., introduction, implications), and article innovativeness. This article concludes with an actionable “how-to” guide for ways to increase article impacts in relation to different JSR audiences.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/10946705211024732 [Google]

 

Varman, R., D. Vijay and P. Skålén (2021): The Conflicting Conventions of Care: Transformative Service as Justice and Agape, Journal of Service Research, (), pp.1

In this study, we examine the conflicts and unintended consequences that arise from the diverse social conventions constituting a transformative service. We draw on convention theory and an ethnographic study to interpret a community-based palliative care initiative in Kerala (India) as a transformative service system. We contribute to transformative service research by developing a dialectical transformative service system framework that is a synthesis of the calculative conflict-ridden regime of justice and the noncalculative regime of agape based on love. In this framework, the calculative regime of justice has civic conventions at its core and industrial, inspired, market, domestic, and fame conventions as ancillaries. While the regime of justice is associated with the undesired, unintended consequence of conflicts, the regime of agape constitutes a desirable unintended consequence. Our framework provides a microlevel understanding of disputes and their reconciliation, advances a diffused understanding of worth that ruptures the binary of legitimate or illegitimate actions, and delineates the significance of morality. Our study also contributes by explaining agape’s role in transformative service, particularly in health and caregiving.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/10946705211018503 [Google]

 

Parkinson, J., L. Schuster and R. Mulcahy (2021): Online Third Places: Supporting Well-Being Through Identifying and Managing Unintended Consequences, Journal of Service Research, (), pp.1

Unintended consequences of service are important yet infrequently examined in transformative service research. This research examines an online service community that transformed into an online third place, with consumers socializing and forming lasting relationships. Using practice-informed theory-building and an abductive reasoning approach, findings are presented from both manual and automated coding of three qualitative data sets that form the basis of a case study examining an online weight management service forum. Extending beyond current conceptualizations of the third place, this study is the first to propose a framework delineating online third place characteristics and their impact on consumers’ eudaimonic (the capacity for self-realization) and hedonic (attainment of pleasure and avoidance of pain) well-being. Findings show that in the absence of a physical or virtual servicescape, social factors including social density, equity, and personalization are key to constructing an online third place that supports well-being through building social connections and enjoyment. The new framework provides guidance for service managers to transform their online service communities into online third places to support consumer well-being and to identify and manage potential unintended consequences, for example, by ensuring segmentation of the community based on consumer groups’ shared interests and consumer empowerment through participation.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/10946705211018860 [Google]

 

Martín-Herrán, G. and S. P. Sigué (2021): Demand-Enhancing Services for Tangible Products in a Distribution System With Online and Off-Line Channels, Journal of Service Research, (), pp.1

Services such as delivery, warranty, and product returns that are bundled with various tangible products play a critical role in their market performance. As manufacturers strive to streamline operations and deliver consistent services across channels, this article analytically examines whether those who sell their products directly online and off-line through retailers should direct control, delegate to retailers, or outsource to third parties the delivery of these services. Our main findings are as follows. Manufacturers should not outsource demand-enhancing services to third parties if they do not ensure relatively low operating costs, as they reduce the level of service provided to customers. Assuming no channel partner has a cost advantage in service delivery, manufacturers should directly control the provision of services that are used identically by online and off-line customers. Manufacturers may not be able to directly and cost effectively offer services that are used differently by online and off-line customers. In such a context, depending on the relative sizes of off-line and online market bases, retailers may be considered either as single providers of the service for both online and off-line customers or jointly with manufacturers as providers for off-line customers only. We discuss the implications of these findings.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/10946705211022841 [Google]

 

Luyen, T., H. Shabbir and D. Dean (2021): A Multidimensional Practice-Based Framework of Interactive Value Formation, Journal of Service Research, (), pp.1

This study seeks to deconstruct the multidimensionality of the Interactive Value Formation (IVF) process within complex and prolonged Technology-Based Self-Services (TBSSs). Building on practice theory and Service Dominant logic, this framework sheds light on the complexity of practice-based resource integration processes within the IVF process. The findings demonstrate firstly, how IVF can result in both value co-creation and co-destruction and secondly, how these outcomes are influenced by the enactment of practices within the service experience. Finally, this study demonstrates the mediating role of consumer intensity as a function of consumer effort and time during this enactment. The suggested framework emphasizes the role of engagement, as intersecting between resource-based practices and outcomes, and the nested nature of the IVF process. In doing so, the relationship between the multiple outcomes of engagement and variations in loyalty are revealed. The study has implications for service managers responsible for user experience of complex and prolonged TBSSs. Directions for future research can focus on further deconstructing the multi-dimensionality of the IVF process.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/10946705211025606 [Google]

 

Zhang, M., L. Sun, F. Qin and G. A. Wang (2021): E-service quality on live streaming platforms: swift guanxi perspective, Journal of Services Marketing, 35(3), pp.312-324

Purpose: In recent years, more and more e-retailers have adopted live streaming services to attract customers. Although the extant literature has mostly examined the motivations for live streaming usage, it remains unclear how to enhance customers’ purchase behaviour. Based on the social exchange theory, in the context of live streaming platforms (LSP), this study aims to investigate the impact of information quality and interaction quality on swift guanxi and customers’ purchase intention. Design/methodology/approach: This study conducted an online survey to conduct two rounds of data collection and analyses the data using SPSS and SmartPLS softwares. Findings: The results show that information quality (believability, usefulness and vividness) and interaction quality (responsiveness, real-time interaction and empathy) are positively related to swift guanxi, which may influence customers’ online purchase intention on LSP. Originality/value: Prior service quality studies tend to focus on traditional physical stores and e-commerce websites context. This study offers the description of key dimensions of service quality on emerging LSP context. The study also confirms the importance of swift guanxi in an online marketplace.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSM-01-2020-0009 [Google]

 

Tsiotsou, R. H. (2021): Introducing relational dialectics on actor engagement in the social media ecosystem, Journal of Services Marketing, 35(3), pp.349-366

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide an in-depth understanding of actor engagement (AE) on social media by proposing a holistic and integrative conceptual framework. Design/methodology/approach: Based on a sample of 118 articles, the paper draws on the service-dominant logic (SDL)-based service ecosystem perspective combined with the tenets of relational dialectics as theoretical lenses to inform AE research in social media. Findings: The paper proposes a framework of AE in social media called the TASC model, an acronym of Thesis-Antithesis-Synthesis-Conflict. TASC introduces the dialectical nature of AE and discusses the contexts and levels of AE in the social media ecosystem and their evolving processes. Practical implications: Firms can apply the knowledge provided by TASC to gather marketing intelligence and develop marketing strategies to anticipate tensions, motivate the desired AE intensity and valence and reinforce value co-creation in the social media ecosystem. Originality/value: TASC is a comprehensive framework that, for the first time, explains engagement at all levels of the social media ecosystem by combining the SDL-based service ecosystem view with the relational dialectics perspective.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSM-01-2020-0027 [Google]

 

Rosenbaum, M. S. and R. Russell-Bennett (2021): When service technologies and human experiences intersect, Journal of Services Marketing, 35(3), pp.261-264

Purpose: This paper aims to identify future research opportunities that address human–technology service interactions. Design/methodology/approach: This editorial is based on the author’s personal reflections and conceptualizations of ideas from past previous research and theory. Findings: The authors identify three opportunities for further research on technology and humanity: service technology and social interaction and service technology and societal prosperity. Research limitations/implications: Service researchers need to realize that topics such as technology, robots, artificial intelligence are not mutually exclusive from topics that seek to improve the human condition, such as transformative service research. We encourage service researchers to explore how digital technologies in service domains impacts consumers, communities, and even, global humanity. Practical implications: Researchers have guidance on areas in which pioneering theoretical and methodological opportunities abound. Originality/value: This editorial offers new perspectives on technology and humanity considering the effect of the global pandemic.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSM-03-2021-0096 [Google]

 

Pham, T.-A. N., J. C. Sweeney and G. N. Soutar (2021): Customer effort in mandatory and voluntary value cocreation: a study in a health care context, Journal of Services Marketing, 35(3), pp.381-397

Purpose: This study aims to examine the impacts various types of resources had on customer effort in mandatory and voluntary value cocreation activities and the contribution of efforts in these different activity types to quality of life. Design/methodology/approach: Data from customers across five chronic health conditions were collected through an online survey. Rasch analysis helped identify hierarchies of activities representing varying levels of effort across four activity types (mandatory (customer), mandatory (customer or organization), voluntary in-role and voluntary extra-role activities). The conceptual model that was developed to examine the relationships of interest was analyzed using partial least squares structural equation modeling. Findings: While clinical resources helped mandatory activities and personal network resources facilitated voluntary activities, psychological resources had greater impacts on customer effort across the whole range of activities. Effort in each activity type contributed to the quality of life differently, with voluntary activities having the greatest impacts on quality of life. Practical implications: This study lends support to a holistic approach to health service that requires the mobilization of networks of resources to encourage customers’ engagement in a broad range of activities. Understanding the resources facilitating effort in distinct activity types provides insights to develop strategies to drive value cocreation efforts that subsequently contribute to improvements in quality of life. Originality/value: Drawing on an extensive and nuanced categorization of activities, this study broadened the understanding of the networks of resources that are integrated in customer value cocreation processes and the link between value cocreation efforts and quality of life.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSM-02-2020-0044 [Google]

 

Majid, K. A. (2021): Effect of interactive marketing channels on service customer acquisition, Journal of Services Marketing, 35(3), pp.299-311

Purpose: The cost of customer acquisition is one of the largest expenses that service firms incur due to loss-generating quotes/proposals. This paper aims to connect interactive marketing communications channels with increased customer acquisition and non-interactive marketing communications channels with decreased customer acquisition by service firms. Design/methodology/approach: Two field studies using hazard models were used to assess the probability of acquiring a new customer after the prospect first contacts the firm. Multiple discrete hazard models were used to compare channels against each other. Findings: Three interactive marketing communications channels (word-of-mouth, online review forum, search engine optimization) increased the rate of acquiring a customer over time. I also compared non-interactive channels (billboard/signage, direct mail), but the analysis did not reveal any significant impact on acquisition rate by the non-interactive marketing communications channels. Originality/value: The present study illustrates why the cost of acquisition is so high in the service sector and takes the unique step of linking interactive marketing communications channels with higher customer acquisition rates over time in a services context. Specifically, interactive marketing channels enable customers to find firms that offer the attributes that they seek, thereby increasing acquisition probabilities and decreasing acquisition costs.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSM-08-2019-0282 [Google]

 

Lindsey-Hall, K. K., S. Jaramillo, T. L. Baker and J. M. Arnold (2021): Authenticity, rapport and interactional justice in frontline service: the moderating role of need for uniqueness, Journal of Services Marketing, 35(3), pp.367-380

Purpose: This paper aims to investigate how perceptions of employee authenticity and customer–employee rapport influence customers’ interactional justice assessments and related service evaluations, and how customers’ need for uniqueness impacts these relationships. Design/methodology/approach: A multi-method, three-study design is used to test the research model. Specifically, structural equation modeling provides tests of the main hypotheses, and two supplemental experimental studies tease out conditional effects providing insightful managerial contributions. Findings: Results indicate that customers’ perceptions of employee authenticity affect customers’ interactional justice evaluations, particularly when customers identify high levels of customer–employee rapport. Additionally, the aforementioned relationships are contingent upon customers’ need for uniqueness, such that customers with higher levels of need for uniqueness experience lower levels of customer–employee rapport and, consequently, provide poorer interactional justice assessments. Finally, conditional effects are found given the type of provider and frequency of visit. Originality/value: This research extends prior efforts to understand how customer–employee dynamics influence customers’ service encounter evaluations. In particular, it furthers understanding of authentic FLE–customer encounters, explores drivers of interactional justice and explicates how consumers’ varying levels of need for uniqueness have differential effects on service outcomes.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSM-11-2019-0434 [Google]

 

Kingshott, R. P. J., S. S. Gaur, P. Sharma, S. F. Yap and Y. Kucherenko (2021): Made for each other? Psychological contracts and service brands evaluations, Journal of Services Marketing, 35(3), pp.271-286

Purpose: This paper aims to investigate the individual and combined effects of three types of psychological contracts between customers and service employees (i.e. transactional, relational and communal), resulting from the service organizations’ relational marketing efforts, on their customers’ service brand evaluations in terms of their satisfaction, trust and commitment toward the brand. Design/methodology/approach: This study uses a field-survey of 303 regular customers of beauty salons and hairdressers in Auckland, New Zealand. All the constructs were measured using adapted versions of well-established scales and data was analyzed using SmartPLS due to the relatively smaller sample size and the primary research objective being the prediction of the three outcome variables (i.e. satisfaction, trust and commitment). Findings: Transactional and relational contracts have a negative and positive impact, respectively, upon communal contracts. Communal contracts mediate the impact of transactional and relational contracts on trust and commitment but not on satisfaction. Trust also mediates the relationship between satisfaction and commitment. Research limitations/implications: This paper collected data from female customers of beauty salons and hairdressers in New Zealand, which may affect the generalizability of the results. Practical implications: This study provides practical insights into the differences in the roles of psychological contracts between the customers and service employees, which may help managers in service firms improve their customer relationship outcomes. Originality/value: This paper extends the relationship and services marketing literature to reveal the individual and combined effects of the three types of psychological contracts on customer satisfaction, trust and commitment toward their service brand.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSM-01-2020-0002 [Google]

 

Chéron, E., C. Weins and F. Kohlbacher (2021): Older consumers’ reaction to a patronizing sales interaction, Journal of Services Marketing, 35(3), pp.287-298

Purpose: The purpose of this study is to investigate the impact of patronizing by salespeople when interacting with older consumers in a retail situation of shopping for a mobile phone. In addition to patronizing behavior, the impact of the age of the salesperson and gender of the consumer are explored. Design/methodology/approach: The study is based on statistical analyzes of a between-participants controlled experiment collected via an online survey of 338 members of the German Senior Citizens League. Findings: The study contributes to the field of services marketing by confirming that older consumers reject patronizing sales interactions and by showing that men are more tolerant of condescendence than women, especially when younger salespeople are involved. Research limitations/implications: A limitation of this study is the use of fictional situations with a selected number of manipulated variables in a simulated sales interaction. Practical implications: Rejection of a patronizing sales interaction was found to be similar by both genders with an older salesperson. Furthermore, retail shops of technical appliances could prevent potential problems by being cautious of having younger male salespeople interacting with older women customers. Originality/value: Research on the impact of condescending sales interaction as perceived by older consumers is scarce and has not previously considered the role of customer gender and salesperson age. Beyond investigating the perception of participants to patronizing, the role of the salesperson age and customer gender were investigated.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSM-11-2019-0436 [Google]

 

Ameen, N., A. Tarhini, M. Shah and N. O. Madichie (2021): Going with the flow: smart shopping malls and omnichannel retailing, Journal of Services Marketing, 35(3), pp.325-348

Purpose: The transition from multichannel to omnichannel retailing requires a better conceptualisation, especially for customer experience in smart shopping malls. Therefore, this study aims to propose a theoretical model that captures customers’ omnichannel experiences in smart shopping malls in terms of personal interaction, physical environment and virtual environment encounters. It examines the mediating role of flow experience on the relationship between the three types of encounters and customers’ intention to revisit smart shopping malls. Design/methodology/approach: The study draws on four key theories: the service encounter model, trust-commitment theory, flow theory and experiential value theory. A total of 553 completed questionnaires were collected from customers (millennials) in the United Kingdom (UK). The data was analysed using partial least squares-structural equation modelling. Findings: The findings show that physical environment encounters and personal interaction encounters play a significant role in customers’ omnichannel experiences in smart malls. Also, of significance are the following aspects of virtual environment encounters: interface design, personalisation, trust, privacy, consumer–peer interaction and relationship commitment. The findings highlight the significant mediating role of flow on the relationships between these three types of encounters and intention, and the effect of flow on omnichannel service usage in smart shopping malls. Originality/value: The research contributes to the existing literature by proposing a conceptual model: the smart shopping mall omnichannel customer experience (SSMCE) model. The findings offer practical guidance to shopping malls and retailers who wish to enhance the customer omnichannel experience.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSM-02-2020-0066 [Google]

 

Gursoy, D., A. S. Can, N. Williams and Y. Ekinci (2021): Evolving impacts of COVID-19 vaccination intentions on travel intentions, Service Industries Journal, (), pp.1-15

This study examines the evolving impacts of COVID-19 vaccination intentions and vaccine hesitancy on travel intentions. The study also examines the sociodemographic factors that can influence willingness to take the vaccine and vaccine hesitancy since achieving herd immunity is critical for social and economic recovery. Data were collected through five surveys from a total of 4,223 individuals in the USA between February 2021 and May of 2021. The findings of the study indicate that over 70 per cent of the respondents are willing to get vaccinated with a COVID-19 vaccine. Vaccination intention and hesitancy rates have also been stable over time. Early in the vaccination process, vaccination intentions negatively impacted travel intentions, suggesting that individuals who are willing to get the vaccine postponed their travels in the short term, while individuals who do not plan to get the vaccine may not have changed their travel plans as travel restrictions were eased. However, this negative impact disappeared later as the number of vaccinated individuals significantly increased, closing the gap between the two groups. Findings also suggest that sociodemographic factors such as generational age, gender, marital status, education, region, race, religion, occupation influence the COVID-19 vaccination intention and vaccine hesitancy. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2021.1938555 [Google]

 

Pan, L., X. a. Xu, L. Lu and D. Gursoy (2021): How cultural confidence affects local residents’ wellbeing, Service Industries Journal, 41(44449), pp.581-605

This study provides and tests an integrated model that explores the effect of cultural confidence on residents’ spiritual wellbeing and the impacts of spiritual, social and psychological wellbeing on subjective wellbeing. Using Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region of China as the research site, 356 responses are collected via a field survey. A mixed-method approach is used to conceptualize and develop measures of cultural confidence. PLS-SEM results indicate significant positive relationships between cultural confidence and three dimensions of spiritual wellbeing (such as personal, environmental and communal). Spiritual wellbeing has a strong influence on social, psychological, and subjective wellbeing. Social wellbeing is positively related to psychological wellbeing, which in turn leads to subjective wellbeing. This research proposes and validates an integral framework that explains the development of residents’ subjective wellbeing. Findings have significant implications to destination policy decision-making in support of tourism development.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2018.1540595 [Google]

 

Gursoy, D. and L. Altinay (2021): The Silk Road and the service industries, Service Industries Journal, 41(44385), pp.441-445

This study makes a significant theoretical contribution to brand equity literature by introducing brand experience value and brand self-congruity into brand equity model. Over the past year and a half, the service and retail industries have been through some of the hardest one times in their history due to the COVID-19 pandemic (Prentice et al., [8]). Chichkanov et al. ([1]) investigate the drivers for innovation in knowledge-intensive business services (KIBS) utilizing data collected from Russia since KIBS significantly contributes to the economic growth and competitive advantage of emerging markets, including Silk Road countries. The Silk Road initiative provides significant opportunities for building an open-minded, comprehensive, balanced, and inclusive regional economic cooperation framework that can benefit service industries and improve the quality of life of the citizens of the countries located along the Silk Road. [Extracted from the article]Copyright of Service Industries Journal is the property of Routledge and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2021.1928823 [Google]

 

Prodanova, J., S. San-Martín and N. Jimenez (2021): Are you technologically prepared for mobile shopping?, Service Industries Journal, 41(44449), pp.648-670

This study explores the influence of travellers’ technology readiness on variables derived from the Theory of Planned Behavior [Ajzen, I. (1991). The theory of planned behavior. Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, 50(2), 179–211. doi:10.1016/0749-5978(91)90020-T] in the context of mobile purchases of travel-related services. The model estimation, using structural equation modelling and data from 220 Spanish online buyers of travels, suggests that technologically ready customers are more prone to be persuaded by others’ opinions, perceive more control and have greater intentions to purchase a travel by mobile phone. In contrast, consumers’ technology readiness does not appear to improve their attitudes toward mobile phone advertising. This technology readiness construct partially extends the Theory of Planned Behavior and constitutes a primary determinant of consumers’ intentions to purchase travel services through mobile phones. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2018.1492561 [Google]

 

Aliza, K., S. Shaheen, M. J. Malik, S. Zulfiqar, S. A. Batool, M. Ahmad-ur-Rehman and A. Javed (2021): Linking ostracism with employee negligence behavior: a moderated mediation model, Service Industries Journal, (), pp.1-25

The work-related antecedents of negative behavior are well known, but less is known about cross-domain antecedents, specifically how workplace ostracism affects negligence behavior. Our study aims to address this limitation by considering the Stress-Non-Equilibrium-Compensation (SNEC) Approach and Conservation of Resources (COR) Theory; we propose a moderated mediation model wherein workplace ostracism instigates nurse’s negligence behavior through emotional exhaustion, and task interdependence act as the boundary condition. The current study proposed and empirically tested the moderated mediation model. A time-lagged three-wave survey design was utilized and data was collected from (N = 402) nurses. The findings indicate that emotional exhaustion could mediate the relationship between ostracism and nurses’ negligence behavior. Furthermore, the results from the moderated mediation analysis suggest that the mediation of emotional exhaustion is moderated by task interdependence such that with a higher level of task interdependence, the mediation effect of emotional exhaustion becomes weaker. Theoretical and managerial implications are discussed. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2021.1933456 [Google]

 

Lien, C.-H., M. K. Hsu, J.-Z. Shang and S. W. Wang (2021): Self-service technology adoption by air passengers: a case study of fast air travel services in Taiwan, Service Industries Journal, 41(44449), pp.671-695

Self-service kiosks have become increasingly visible at airports. To date, however, research has not fully investigated air travelers’ perceptions of fast air travel services and the factors influencing air travelers’ intentions to adopt fast air travel services. Filling this gap and built upon the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) model, the present study proposed an integrated model featuring the relationship among perceived benefits of fast air travel services, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, perceived behavioral control, attitude, subjective norm, and adoption intentions. Using the mall intercept approach, a survey research project was conducted at an international airport in Taiwan, and a total of 582 valid responses were obtained. Empirical findings reveal that the perceived benefits of fast air travel services could be further categorized into six benefits: document scanning, bags to go, flight rebooking, self-boarding, bag recovery, and self-check-in. Meanwhile, the perceived benefits of fast air travel services positively and significantly influence perceived behavioral control, perceived ease of use, and perceived usefulness. Perceived ease of use positively and significantly influences the perceived usefulness of fast air travel services. Moreover, perceived usefulness predicts air travelers’ attitudes toward and intentions to use fast air travel services. Perceived behavioral control positively influences adoption intentions. The theoretical contributions and managerial implications are discussed at the end of this paper. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2019.1569634 [Google]

 

Ma, J., X. Zhou and Z. Mu (2021): Can abusive supervision motivate customer-oriented service sabotage? A multilevel research, Service Industries Journal, 41(44449), pp.696-717

This study explores the influence of abusive supervision on customer-oriented service sabotage (COSS). Based on social identity theory, it investigates the mediating role of organizational identification. Meanwhile, it examines the moderating role of sensitivity to interpersonal mistreatment (SIM) in strengthening the effects of abusive supervision on COSS and organizational identification. To reduce the concerns of common method bias (CMB), we administrated three-wave and two-resource data collection from thirteen hotels of three cities in China. Hierarchical linear modeling (HLM) and bootstrapping are utilized to examine hypotheses. The results showed that abusive supervision positively affects service employees’ COSS through lowering their organizational identification. Furthermore, it was found that SIM can magnify abusive supervision’s impacts on COSS and organizational identification such that these influences were stronger for those with higher SIM. Finally, contributions and limitations are discussed. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2020.1715949 [Google]

 

Chen, L. S.-L. and J.-H. Chen (2021): Antecedents and optimal industrial customers on cloud services adoption, Service Industries Journal, 41(44449), pp.606-632

The rapid flourishing of the cloud service market necessitates investigating the underlying determinants of cloud services adoption and identifying optimal industrial customers for business-to-business (B2B) service encounters. Many studies have addressed technical and operational concerns related to cloud services. However, only a few studies have addressed the adoption of cloud computing from an organizational perspective, and none of them have considered the practical application of cloud computing in society. Therefore, in this paper, a research model is constructed to understand an industrial organization’s acceptance of cloud services and apply the results in order to explore optimal industrial customers. A questionnaire-based survey was used to collect data from the population, 227 firms in the manufacturing and services industries in Taiwan. Causal relationships were tested through structural equation modeling and the ordering of optimal industrial customers was evaluated by using the Technique for Order of Preference by Similarity to Ideal Solution method. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2018.1437907 [Google]

 

Kim, S. Y. and Y. Yi (2021): Inter-customer helping behaviors: a virtuous cycle or unwanted intrusion?, Service Industries Journal, 41(44449), pp.633-647

The current research investigates a specific type of customer engagement behavior (CEB), inter-customer helping. Specifically, the current research investigates (1) the antecedents (e.g. how receiving voluntary vs. solicited help from other customers affects customer satisfaction), (2) the processes (e.g. affective and cognitive paths to customer satisfaction), (3) the outcomes (e.g. whether increased satisfaction leads to higher willingness to help others in need), and (4) the boundary condition (e.g. when receiving help would increase customer satisfaction) of inter-customer helping. The results from two studies demonstrate that receiving voluntary (vs. solicited) help increases customer satisfaction through positive interaction affect and enhanced perceived service climate. The results also show that increased customer satisfaction leads to increased willingness to help others. Finally, the results demonstrate that perceived importance of competence moderates the effect of receiving help on customer satisfaction. Overall, the current research contributes to the service literature through suggesting new links between CEB and customer satisfaction. (English)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2018.1461842 [Google]

 

Png, I. P. L. and C. H. Y. Tan (2021): Cost of Cash: Evidence from Cashiers, Service Science, 13(2), pp.88-108

An important but overlooked cost of payments in retailing is the cost on checkout cashiers. This paper examines the compensating wage differential that cashiers require to handle payments in cash. First, a multicountry panel data study shows that cashier wages increase with retail cash usage, which is consistent with cashiers requiring compensation to handle cash. Second, in a discrete choice experiment where supermarket cashiers chose between collecting card and cash payments, eight of 10 cashiers preferred card to cash. Among those who preferred card, the median cashier required a wage premium of S$37.50 (US$27) a month to handle cash. The premium was lower among cashiers who are local, less risk averse, and younger. Third, in a laboratory study, subjects traded off earnings against stress. With higher frequency of cash payments, high earners experienced greater physiological stress than low earners. Earnings also increased with abilities in arithmetic and coping with stress. Collectively, these studies show that cashiers require higher wages to handle cash payments, in part due to higher stress. We offer policy, managerial, and research implications for job design, payment systems, and workplace stress.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2021.0272 [Google]

 

Maclean, K. D. S. (2021): Value of Stars on Broadway: A Case Study, Service Science, 13(2), pp.77-87

Highly qualified employees are a critical element of a service experience. Utilizing the theatre metaphor, we showcase a method to value these employees with a case study on Broadway. Using a novel data set that includes Broadway show revenues, private expense data, and actor usage, our case study shows that stars were associated with increased revenues in the weeks they were present. However, after taking into account their effects on surrounding weeks? revenues, their impact was significantly less. After accounting for the costs of hiring a star, we estimate a positive but not statistically significant impact on profit. We discuss managerial implications for designers of service experiences.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2021.0273 [Google]

 

Jiao, Y., C. S. Tang and J. Wang (2021): Selling Virtual Items in Free-to-Play Games: Transparent Selling vs. Opaque Selling, Service Science, 13(2), pp.53-76

The market for online games is huge, but research on the economics of online game operations remains nascent. In this paper, we focus on ?free-to-play? online games in which a game provider offers players an option to purchase game-specific virtual goods (items) for improving their winning chances before the game begins. Because selling virtual items is the main revenue stream in free-to-play games, it is important for game providers to find ways to entice players to purchase virtual items. We observe that some game providers disclose the opponent?s skill level before the game begins by using a ?transparent selling? mechanism to sell virtual items, whereas others conceal this information from the players. This observation motivates us to examine whether and when game providers should adopt transparent selling. By analyzing a game-theoretical model that involves one game provider and two competitive players, we obtain the following results. First, when the price of the virtual goods is endogenously determined by the game provider, we find that transparent selling is not effective: it is optimal for the provider to adopt ?opaque selling? by concealing the opponent?s skill level information from players. However, opaque selling hurts the player?s welfare. Second, when the selling price is exogenously given, transparent selling dominates opaque selling when the given price is high. Our results identify the conditions under which transparent selling dominates opaque selling.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2021.0271 [Google]

 

Tracey, J. B. (2021): Looking Back and Forward, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 67(2), pp.172-172

About a year ago, before we understood the implications of COVID-19 (and I suspect we won’t know the full extent for quite some time), I used this platform to note that there is plenty of evidence which shows that the models and theories derived from general business and management disciplines are widely applicable to hospitality and tourism contexts. However, we also know there is plenty of variance that is not explained by discipline-based models that have been applied to date, and as such, I contended that alternative, industry-informed models and frameworks are needed to more accurately account for the salient and distinctive elements associated with the hospitality and tourism settings. The pandemic has put a spotlight on the vulnerability of the industry, and the continuing fallout demonstrates that there is a great deal to learn about how firms respond to environmental shocks. [Extracted from the article]Copyright of Cornell Hospitality Quarterly is the property of Sage Publications Inc. and its content may not be copied or emailed to multiple sites or posted to a listserv without the copyright holder’s express written permission. However, users may print, download, or email articles for individual use. This abstract may be abridged. No warranty is given about the accuracy of the copy. Users should refer to the original published version of the material for the full abstract. (Copyright applies to all Abstracts.)

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965521998556 [Google]

 

Kwok, L., J. Lee and S. H. Han (2021): Crisis Communication on Social Media: What Types of COVID-19 Messages Get the Attention?, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, (), pp.1

This study assessed internet users’ attention to hospitality companies’ COVID-19 messages on social media. We used 657 Facebook and 754 Twitter messages initiated by eight of the world’s largest hotel chains between January and mid-June 2020 for the exploratory analysis. Under the situational crisis communication theory, the analysis reveals that hotels shared five types of COVID-19 (Prevention, Reminding, Ingratiation, Victimage, and Updates) versus Non-COVID-19 messages. Descriptive analysis and a series of t test, analysis of variance, and post hoc analyses reveal that hotels did not share any COVID-19 information until March 2020. Moreover, COVID-19 messages only accounted for about 20% of all messages, among which hotels shared Ingratiation and Updates messages most often. COVID-19 messages received more reactions, comments, and shares/retweets than Non-COVID-19 messages on both Facebook and Twitter, indicating the attention paid to the COVID-19 messages posted on a business’ social media page, which can help businesses spread the information in their networks. Specifically, Prevention, Reminding (although underused), Ingratiation, Updates, and messages with photos and videos received more attention. Such findings extend the crisis communication literature and help businesses develop effective communication strategies to engage their stakeholders on social media during the pandemic.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/19389655211028143 [Google]

 

Kim, K. and M. A. Baker (2021): Luxury Branding in the Hospitality Industry: The Impact of Employee’s Luxury Appearance and Elitism Attitude, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, (), pp.1

Some of the luxury consumption literature suggests that luxury consumption is a beneficial social signal for the actor which facilitates social interaction. However, a different stream of recent research suggests that luxury consumption bears social costs to the actor. In the employee–customer interaction context, wearing luxury brands can either benefit or backfire for the employee depending on the situation whether luxury status or warmth is necessary. Based on the gaps in the literature, this study examines the impact of employee conspicuous cues by utilizing luxury consumption and elitism attitude on employee–customer rapport and behavioral intentions. The study results show that employees wearing luxury brands increase customers’ perceived impression management toward the employee. Such perception is strengthened when employees show an elitism attitude. In addition, when employees wear luxury brands, customers are more likely to build rapport with employees when they show a democratic attitude, as they perceive the employees are less likely to involve in impression management than showing an elitism attitude. The results build upon the luxury hospitality literature, aesthetic labor, impression management, and rapport literature.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/19389655211022660 [Google]

 

Kim, J., S. I. Kim and M. Lee (2021): What to Sell and How to Sell Matters: Focusing on Luxury Hotel Properties’ Business Performance and Efficiency, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, (), pp.1

Due to service product characteristics and a mix of complex sales, it is crucial for hotel firms to efficiently design limited physical spaces that serve multiple purposes to optimize revenue and maximize profit. Since luxury hotel properties have different operation strategies than limited-service hotels, their operational efficiency should be a reference during strategic decision-making processes. Primary research purpose is to identify the most efficient operation model for luxury hotel properties. The study computed operation efficiency scores using the data envelopment analysis approach to rank the property efficiency of 37 fully equipped luxury hotels in the United States. Each property can utilize slack analysis to discover a strategic benchmarking company (best efficient frontier) and intuitive strategic recommendations and gain superior input and output productivity. Tobit model analysis provides supplemental understandings regarding the additional operational factors impacting luxury hotel properties’ efficiency score variations. Operating efficiency was found to be achieved by multiple operating inputs and influenced by relative price, fixed costs, and management systems. Theoretical comprehensiveness of luxury service mix has been empirically tested by highlighting efficiency as a key measure. In addition, RevPAR’s ratio on TRevPAR further highlights the importance for luxury hotels to increase non-room sales and revenues to accomplish efficiency.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/19389655211020254 [Google]

 

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