Considered Service-specific journals were Journal of Service Research, Journal of Service Management, Journal of Services Marketing, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, Service Industries Journal, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, and Service Science.

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Parasuraman, A., J. Ball, L. Aksoy, T. L. Keiningham and M. Zaki (2021): More than a feeling? Toward a theory of customer delight, Journal of Service Management, 32(1), pp.1-26

Purpose: Responding to an increasing call for a more comprehensive conceptualization of customer delight, the purpose of this paper is to expand the theory of customer delight and to examine the implications of such an expanded view for service theory and practice. Design/methodology/approach: This paper presents the results of three qualitative studies. The first study explores customer delight through self-reported consumption experiences in customer-selected contexts, followed by one-on-one in-depth interviews. The second involves focus groups and the third examines self-reported incidents of delightful customer experiences. Findings: This research finds that customer delight goes beyond extreme satisfaction and joy and surprise to include six properties that—individually or in combination—characterize customer delight. An expanded conceptualization of how customer delight can be defined is proposed in which customer delight is associated with various combinations of six properties – the customer experiencing positive emotions, interacting with others, successful problem-solving, engaging customer’s senses, timing of the events and sense of control that characterizes the customer’s encounter. Research limitations/implications: It is clear from the findings of this research that there is no single property that is associated with delight. Through the facilitation of multiple properties, managers have the potential to create a multitude of routes to delight. It is recommended that future research (1) identify and explicate these alternative routes for engendering delight using the six properties identified, and (2) develop a general typology based on service context and characteristics, customer segment, etc. that further stimulates scholarship on delight, and offers more industry-specific insights for managers. Practical implications: Insights from this investigation will encourage managers and service designers to think more broadly and creatively about delight. Doing so will open up new opportunities for achieving customer delight, beyond merely focusing on extreme satisfaction or surprise and joy strategies currently dominating discussions of customer delight. Originality/value: This paper makes several contributions to the service literature. First, it extends current conceptualizations of customer delight and offers an expanded definition. Next, it demonstrates how this new understanding extends the existing literature on delight. Finally, it proposes an agenda for future delight research and discusses managerial implications, opening up new opportunities for firms to design delightful customer experiences.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JOSM-03-2019-0094 [Google]

 

Heinonen, K. and T. Strandvik (2021): Reframing service innovation: COVID-19 as a catalyst for imposed service innovation, Journal of Service Management, 32(1), pp.101-112

Purpose: The empirical study draws on a crowdsourced database of 221 innovations associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. Design/methodology/approach: Aside from the health and humanitarian crisis, the COVID-19 pandemic has caused an acute economic downturn in most sectors, forcing public and private organizations to rethink and reconfigure service provision. The paper introduces the concept of imposed service innovation as a new strategic lens to augment the extant view of service innovation as a primarily discretionary activity. Findings: The identified imposed service innovations were assigned to 11 categories and examined in terms of their strategic horizon and strategic stretch. The innovations are characterized by spatial flexibility, social and health outreach and exploitation of technology. Research limitations/implications: As a new area of service innovation research, imposed service innovations highlight strategic issues that include the primacy of customers and the fragility of institutions. Practical implications: Situations involving imposed service innovation represent opportunities for rapid business development when recognized as such. A severe disruption such as a pandemic can catalyze managerial rethinking as organizations are forced to look beyond their existing business strategies. Social implications: As a strategic response to severe disruption of institutions, markets and service offerings, imposed service innovations afford opportunities to implement transformation and enhance well-being. This novel strategic lens foregrounds a societal account of service innovation, emphasizing societal relevance and context beyond the challenges of business viability alone. Originality/value: While extant service innovation research has commonly focused on discretionary activities that enable differentiation and growth, imposed service innovations represent actions for resilience and renewal.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JOSM-05-2020-0161 [Google]

 

Hall, M. C., G. Prayag, P. Fieger and D. Dyason (2021): Beyond panic buying: consumption displacement and COVID-19, Journal of Service Management, 32(1), pp.113-128

Purpose: This study evaluates consumption displacement, the shift in consumption that occurs when consumers experience a change in the availability of goods, services and amenities to which they are accustomed as the result of an external event, and which is characterised by the points in space and time where consumption occurs and by the movements to, from, and between those points, that is occurring as a result of the effects of COVID-19 on the services sector in the Canterbury region of New Zealand. Design/methodology/approach: Based on consumer spending data, the authors identify patterns of consumption displacement for the hospitality and retail sectors as defined by ANZSIC. We answer where, when, how, what and why consumption displacement happens. Findings: The findings provide evidence of spatial and temporal displacement of consumption based on consumer spending patterns. Evidence of increased spending in some consumption categories confirms stockpiling behaviours. The hospitality sector experiences a sharp decline in consumer spending over lockdown. Originality/value: Given the lack of studies analysing the impacts of crises and disasters on the services sector and consumption displacement, this study provides evidence of different forms of consumption displacement related to COVID-19.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JOSM-05-2020-0151 [Google]

 

Barnes, D. C., J. Mesmer-Magnus, L. L. Scribner, A. Krallman and R. M. Guidice (2021): Customer delight during a crisis: understanding delight through the lens of transformative service research, Journal of Service Management, 32(1), pp.129-141

Purpose: The unprecedented dynamics of the COVID-19 pandemic has forced firms to re-envision the customer experience and find new ways to ensure positive service encounters. This context has underscored the reality that drivers of customer delight in a “traditional” context are not the same in a crisis context. While research has tended to identify hedonic need fulfillment as key to customer well-being and, ultimately, to invoking customer delight, the majority of studies were conducted in inherently positive contexts, which may limit generalizability to more challenging contexts. Through the combined lens of transformative service research (TSR) and psychological theory on hedonic and eudaimonic human needs, we evaluate the extent to which need fulfillment is the root of customer well-being and that meeting well-being needs ultimately promotes delight. We argue that in crisis contexts, the salience of needs shifts from hedonic to eudaimonic and the extent to which service experiences fulfill eudaimonic needs determines the experience and meaning of delight. Design/methodology/approach: Utilizing the critical incident technique, this research surveyed 240 respondents who were asked to explain in detail a time they experienced customer delight during the COVID-19 pandemic. We analyzed their responses according to whether these incidents reflected the salience of hedonic versus eudaimonic need fulfillment. Findings: The results support the notion that the salience of eudaimonic needs become more pronounced during times of crisis and that service providers are more likely to elicit perceptions of delight when they leverage meeting eudaimonic needs over the hedonic needs that are typically emphasized in traditional service encounters. Originality/value: We discuss the implications of these findings for integrating the TSR and customer delight literatures to better understand how service experiences that meet salient needs produce customer well-being and delight. Ultimately, we find customer delight can benefit well-being across individual, collective and societal levels.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JOSM-05-2020-0146 [Google]

 

Damali, U., E. Secchi, S. S. Tax and D. McCutcheon (2021): Customer participation risk management: conceptual model and managerial assessment tool, Journal of Service Management, 32(1), pp.27-51

Purpose: Customer participation (CP) has received considerable interest in the service literature as a way to improve the customer experience and reduce service providers’ costs. While its benefits are not in question, there is a paucity of research on potential pitfalls. This paper provides a conceptual foundation to address this gap and develops a comprehensive model of the risks of customer participation in service delivery, integrating research from the marketing, operations and supply chain management, strategy, and information technology fields. Design/methodology/approach: The model is derived deductively by integrating insights from research in marketing, operations and supply chain management, strategy, and information technology. Findings: This paper identifies three categories of potential risks of CP (i.e. market, operational, and service network) and discusses ways that firms can mitigate these risks. Building on the model, it develops a CP risk assessment tool that managers can use when evaluating increases in CP. Research limitations/implications: The conceptual model proposed in this paper can serve as a robust basis for future research in customer participation, particularly in such areas as sharing economy services, service delivery networks, and experiential services. The risk assessment tool offers clear guidelines for managers who are considering an increase in customer participation in their service. Originality/value: This is the first attempt to conceptually define customer participation risk and develop a comprehensive model of its drivers and strategies to mitigate it. This paper develops a straightforward method for managers to evaluate CP risk.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JOSM-05-2018-0147 [Google]

 

Aksoy, L., S. Benoit, S. G. Joag, J. Kandampully, T. L. Keiningham and A. L. Yan (2021): Enterprise feedback management (EFM): what lies beyond the hype?, Journal of Service Management, 32(1), pp.53-69

Purpose: The needs of CMOs to utilize a firm’s data productively in order to support decision-making combined with the reported benefits of enterprise feedback management solutions has resulted in a rapid rise in usage and valuation of EFM providers. The explicit promise of EFM providers is improved financial performance, whereas there is no scientific research investigating this link. To investigate the link between EFM usage and financial performance is core of this research. Design/methodology/approach: To gain insight into this link survey data from 127 US-based firms on their usage of EFM platforms was linked to their stock market performance over several years. Findings: This research did not find any significant positive relationships between different aspects of EFM usage investigated and stock returns. It is important to note that these results should not be taken as validation that EFM systems do not result in positive financial outcomes for firms. It may be that superior market performance as measured through stock returns is difficult to observe through a cross-sectional analysis. Instead these results indicate that superior market performance as measured through stock market performance is not an obvious, generalizable outcome for firms that have adopted EFM systems. Originality/value: EFM has rapidly grown across many consumer facing industries, with EFM platform providers receiving very high market valuations on relatively small revenue streams. This is one of the first scientific papers to study the usage and impact of these EFM systems.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JOSM-03-2020-0070 [Google]

 

Bartsch, S., E. Weber, M. Büttgen and A. Huber (2021): Leadership matters in crisis-induced digital transformation: how to lead service employees effectively during the COVID-19 pandemic, Journal of Service Management, 32(1), pp.71-85

Purpose: The COVID-19 pandemic has, besides the health concerns, caused an unprecedented social and economic crisis that has particularly hit service industries hard. Due to extensive safety measures, many service employees have to work remotely to keep service businesses running. With limited literature on leadership and virtual work in the service context, this paper aims to report on leadership effectiveness regarding employees’ work performance in virtual settings brought on by the COVID-19 pandemic. Design/methodology/approach: Drawing on the input–process–outcome (IPO) framework, this research investigates the effectiveness of leadership on service employees’ work performance mediated by work-related tension, autonomy, and group cohesiveness. Furthermore, this study explores moderating effects of the service provider’s digital maturity. To test the derived model, the authors collected survey data from 206 service employees who, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, unexpectedly had to transform to a virtual work environment. The authors analyzed the data using partial least squares structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM). Findings: The results indicated that it took task- and relation-oriented leadership behavior to maintain service employees’ work performance in a virtual environment during crisis situations. Further, results indicated mediating effects of service employees’ individual job autonomy and team cohesiveness; surprisingly, work-related tension did not impact employees’ work performance. Results offered service businesses guidance on how to effectively lead in times of crisis when service employees predominantly work in virtual environments. Originality/value: This is the first empirical study to show how leadership affects service employees’ work performance in a virtual work environment during crisis times. Thus, the study contributes to the scarce literature on the impact of leadership in service firms that have to operate in such a setting.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JOSM-05-2020-0160 [Google]

 

Batat, W. (2021): How Michelin-starred chefs are being transformed into social bricoleurs? An online qualitative study of luxury foodservice during the pandemic crisis, Journal of Service Management, 32(1), pp.87-99

Purpose: The purpose of this research is to examine response strategies and the change in Michelin-starred chefs’ practices to adapt to the global pandemic coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) crisis that has strongly affected the foodservice sector. Design/methodology/approach: The authors conducted an exploratory qualitative research that used mixed-method, combining online interviews with 12 French Michelin-starred chefs and archival data. A manual thematic analysis method was used to analyze the data and identify relevant themes following an iterative coding process. Findings: The findings show that Michelin-starred restaurants implement multilevel response strategies by developing dynamic capabilities while playing a social role through the development of new forms of business practices. The results show that Michelin-starred chefs adopt social bricolage entrepreneurial thinking to deal with the extreme situation and use diverse resources and response strategies to tackle social issues and improve the collective and individual well-being. The authors identified three major response strategies implemented by luxury restaurants: philanthropic activities targeting the well-being of the community, socially responsible business practices to support the foodservice actors and initiatives centered on consumer’s food well-being. Research limitations/implications: The limits of this study are related to the small sample size and the elimination of psychographic criteria such as age and gender, which can extend our understanding of response strategies implemented by female and male owners or by age range during crises in the foodservice sector. Also, given that France is the country of Haute gastronomy, the conclusions of this study may not be generalizable to other countries where the gastronomic culture might be different. Practical implications: Restaurants with high-end or luxury positioning must use multilevel – i.e. individual, sector and societal – response strategies to play a social role while sustaining their businesses during times of crisis. These insights seek to provide a roadmap which can be applied to other sectors to assess response strategies driven by various motives, resources and capabilities. Social implications: This research contributes to transformative service research literature by providing insights regarding how service providers can rethink their activities during the crises to play an active social role. Also, the findings point to several ways in which service actors can help customers and the community to improve their well-being. Originality/value: To our knowledge, no prior research examined both the type of response strategies deployed by companies to survive and the importance of playing a social role and developing socially responsible business practices during times of crisis.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JOSM-05-2020-0142 [Google]

 

Rahman, A. (2020): Sources and categories of well-being: a systematic review and research agenda, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 31(1), pp.1-33

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify the sources and categories of well-being from the transformative service research (TSR) domain. The paper also aims to offer a unified framework of sources and categories of well-being and several future research agenda.Design/methodology/approach A systematic literature review method is applied to address the study aims. A three-phase approach has been applied, which produced a total of 70 peer-reviewed empirical studies for the review.Findings The analysis has identified five major sources and their underlying sub-sources of well-being. The major sources are organization-, individual-, collective-, service system-, and situation-driven sources. The findings further identified two major categories or well-being showing the capacity and functioning, and subjective appraisals of life conditions. The identified sources and categories of well-being develop a unified framework showing a simplistic path or relations between the sources and the categories.Research limitations/implications The paper offers several research agenda explaining what source-related issues can be addressed for enhancing well-being for various entities. It also adds a proposed schema and research questions for examining the possible relations and influences between the sources of well-being and social well-being of individuals.Practical implications Practitioners can get important insights about the matters over which they have little or no control such as the activities, motives and processes that take place in individuals’ and collectives’ spheres and mechanisms of supports in social networks.Originality/value The paper is the first to offer a systematic review on the empirical studies of the TSR domain identifying a comprehensive list of sources and categories of well-being and a resulting unified framework and research agenda.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-01-2020-0024 [Google]

 

Bani-Melhem, S., F. Mohd. Shamsudin, R. Mazen Abukhait and S. Quratulain (2020): Paranoid personality and frontline employee’s proactive work behaviours: a moderated mediation model of empathetic leadership and perceived psychological safety, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 31(1), pp.113-135

Purpose This study expands on research related to the dark side of personality traits by examining how individual dark personality affects proactive work behaviours. Specifically, the authors consider paranoia as a dark personality trait and propose that it negatively relates to perceived psychological safety and indirectly affects frontline employees’ (FLEs) willingness to report customer complaints as well as their extra-role customer service. The authors also posit that empathetic leadership is a focal, contextual factor that mitigates the impact of paranoia on perceived psychological safety and, consequently, the willingness to report customer complaints and engage in extra-role customer service behaviour.Design/methodology/approach The model was tested on a sample of 252 FLEs using process macro (Hayes, 2017) and AMOS. Data were collected from FLEs working in different hospitality organisations using a time-lagged design; supervisor-rated employee extra-role customer service was also measured.Findings The authors found that FLEs with a paranoid personality trait had a lesser sense of psychological safety at work, which reduced their willingness to engage in proactive work behaviours. However, this negative effect was mitigated by the presence of an empathetic leader.Originality/value The results are important because research has yet to determine which actions managers should take to counter the negative effects of dark personalities in the workplace.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-05-2020-0104 [Google]

 

Bin, D., M. Sok Keo, P. Sok and S. Mao (2020): The tipping point: mitigating the curvilinear effect of frontline service employee’s perception of leadership humility on frontline service performance, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 31(1), pp.137-156

Purpose Prior studies have mainly advanced the understanding of a linear relationship between leadership humility and employee work outcomes, mediated and/or moderated by various individual, team and organizational variables. This study attempts to advance prior knowledge by investigating a potential curvilinear relationship between leadership humility and frontline service employee (FSE) performance and the role of FSE’s psychological capital (PsyCap) in attenuating this curvilinear relationship.Design/methodology/approach Survey data were drawn from a survey sample of 273 FSEs working in the hospitality industry of the United States of America. Hierarchical linear regression analysis was used to test the proposed hypotheses.Findings The results uncover the existence of a tipping point in the relationship between leader humility and FSE performance; that is, humble behaviors expressed by leaders positively influence FSE performance up to the tipping point beyond which FSE performance starts to diminish. However, this curvilinear effect is attenuated when FSE’s PsyCap is high but not when it is low.Practical implications The findings provide service managers with insights into the importance of balancing their humble behaviors to yield optimal FSE performance. Furthermore, the paper points to the need for FSE’s PsyCap cultivation within service firms so that FSEs are less dependent on their supervisors and can deliver highly satisfactory results.Originality/value This research is one of the very first to investigate the curvilinear relationship between leader humility and FSE performance and the moderating role of PsyCap in attenuating the curvilinear effect.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-06-2020-0110 [Google]

 

Figueiredo Alcidio, S. and H. Pinto Luisa (2020): Robotizing shared service centres: key challenges and outcomes, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 31(1), pp.157-178

Purpose The introduction of robotic process automation (RPA) in shared service centres (SSCs) can hardly be overlooked. This article, therefore, draws on the institutional theory to widen the understanding of its implementation and outcomes regarding people management. Drawing on the lens of the institutional theory and the literature on SSCs and RPA, this study addresses the key challenges and outcomes of robotization.Design/methodology/approach The study follows a qualitative approach and a purposeful sampling design that collected data from six major SSCs) introducing robotization. Data were collected from semi-structured interviews with service representatives, including RPA project managers. A thematic content analysis was used.Findings The introduction of robotics follows mechanisms of coercive, normative and mimetic isomorphism and is effectively replacing workers. So far, this process has been managed through a few reactive people management practices, such as earlier retirements, internal mobility and outsourcing reduction, which warns of future tensions. The findings also show the emergence of new jobs, such as robot developers and robot managers.Originality/value The paper contributes to the limited empirical body of research in RPA in SSCs. The study is novel as it is one of the first offering an implementation roadmap for other SSCs and illustrates the positive impact on processes redesign. It also provides empirical evidence on the debate about the potential for service workers’ replacement versus tasks augmentation. In the longer term, this study opens new research avenues related to the tensions and contradictions from the progressive institutionalization of robotization in service organizations.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-06-2020-0126 [Google]

 

Mele, C., T. Russo-Spena and V. Kaartemo (2020): The impact of coronavirus on business: developing service research agenda for a post-coronavirus world, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 31(2), pp.184-202

Purpose The coronavirus (COVID-19) has had a tremendous impact on companies worldwide. However, researchers have no clear idea of the key issues requiring their attention. This paper aims to close this gap by analysing all business-related posts on a coronavirus subreddit (“r/coronavirus”) and identifying the main research streams that are guiding the research agenda for a post-coronavirus world.Design/methodology/approach We use data from reddit, particularly the subreddit “r/coronavirus” to identify posts that reveal the impact of coronavirus on business. Our dataset has more than 200,000 posts. We used an artificial intelligence–based algorithm to scrape the data with business-related search terms, clean it and analyse the discussion topics.Findings We show the key topics that address the impact of coronavirus on business, combining them into four themes: essential service provision, bricolage service innovation, responsible shopping practices and market shaping amid crisis. We discuss these themes and use them to develop a service research agenda. The results are reported against the backdrop of service research priorities.Originality/value The study identifies four key themes that have emerged from the impact of coronavirus on business and that require scholarly attention. Our findings can guide service research with unique insights provided immediately after the coronavirus outbreak to conduct research that matters to business and helps people in vulnerable positions in a post-coronavirus world.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-07-2020-0180 [Google]

 

Tortorella, G., G. Narayanamurthy, M. Godinho Filho, A. Portioli Staudacher and F. Mac Cawley Alejandro (2020): Pandemic’s effect on the relationship between lean implementation and service performance, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 31(2), pp.203-224

Purpose This paper aims at examining the impact that COVID-19 pandemic and its related work implications have on the relationship between lean implementation and service performance.Design/methodology/approach The author surveyed service organizations that have been implementing lean for at least two years and remotely maintained their activities during the COVID-19 outbreak. Multivariate data techniques were applied to analyze the dataset. This study was grounded on sociotechnical systems theory.Findings The findings indicate that organizations that have been implementing lean services more extensively are also more likely to benefit from the effects that the COVID-19 had on work environments, especially in the case of home office. Nevertheless, social distancing does not appear to mediate the effects of lean services on both quality and delivery performances.Originality/value Since the pandemic is a recent phenomenon with unprecedented effects, this research is an initial effort to determine the effect the pandemic has on lean implementation and services’ performance, providing both theoretical and practical contributions to the field.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-07-2020-0182 [Google]

 

Brodie Roderick, J., R. Ranjan Kumar, M.-l. Verreynne, Y. Jiang and J. Previte (2021): Coronavirus crisis and health care: learning from a service ecosystem perspective, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 31(2), pp.225-246

Purpose The COVID-19 pandemic has created a crisis for healthcare systems worldwide. There have been significant challenges to managing public and private health care and related services systems’ capacity to cope with testing, treatment and containment of the virus. Drawing on the foundational research by Frow et al. (2019), the paper explores how adopting a service ecosystem perspective provides insight into the complexity of healthcare systems during times of extreme stress and uncertainty.Design/methodology/approach A healthcare framework based on a review of the service ecosystem literature is developed, and the COVID-19 crisis in Australia provides an illustrative case.Findings The study demonstrates how the service ecosystem perspective provides new insight into the dynamics and multilayered nature of a healthcare system during a pandemic. Three propositions are developed that offer directions for future research and managerial applications.Practical implications The research provides an understanding of the relevance of managerial flexibility, innovation, learning and knowledge sharing, which offers opportunities leading to greater resilience in the healthcare system. In particular, the research addresses how service providers in the service ecosystem learn from this pandemic to inform future practices.Originality/value The service ecosystem perspective for health care offers fresh thinking and an understanding of how a shared worldview, institutional practices and supportive and disruptive factors influence the systems’ overall well-being during a crisis such as COVID-19.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-07-2020-0178 [Google]

 

Finsterwalder, J., S. Kabadayi, P. Fisk Raymond and S. Boenigk (2020): Creating hospitable service systems for refugees during a pandemic: leveraging resources for service inclusion, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 31(2), pp.247-263

Purpose The overarching goal of this paper is to increase awareness among researchers and practitioners that refugees are disproportionally impacted by COVID-19, which increases their suffering. Second, it extends a recently introduced transformative refugee service experience framework by integrating and conceptualizing refugees’ resource and service inclusion during a pandemic. Third, it explores lessons learned and implications from the COVID-19 pandemic for the future of service research and practice.Design/methodology/approach This study synthesizes approaches on refugees, resources and transformative service research to develop an extended framework for addressing one of society’s pressing issues during and after pandemics.Findings Recognizing refugees as providing resources rather than just needing or depleting resources can enable more inclusion. It facilitates refugees’ integration into society by drawing on their skills and knowledge. This requires hospitable refugee service systems that enable service inclusion and opportunities for refugee resource integration.Research limitations/implications This article focuses on one vulnerable group in society. However, the extended framework presented warrants broader application to other contexts, such as subsistence marketplaces.Practical implications Managers of service businesses and public policymakers should create more inclusive and hospitable service systems for refugees. This may result in redesigning services, changing consumer behavior and reformulating public policy.Social implications Better inclusion and integration of refugees and their resources should increase their individual well-being, reduce social issues in society, increase overall societal well-being and productivity.Originality/value This article presents a novel extended framework for service scholars and service providers to increase resource and service inclusion of refugees in a disaster context.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-07-2020-0175 [Google]

 

Ranjan Kumar, R., R. Dash, P. Sugathan and W. Mao (2020): Effect of frontline employee’s hope and consumer failure during consumer-created emergencies, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 31(1), pp.35-64

Purpose In important interpersonal service interactions with a frontline employee (FLE), consumers at times fail to carry out their share of responsibility in the execution of the service, resulting in a situation of “consumer created emergency”. This might defeat the consumer’s goal of availing the service (termed as consumer failure). This study explains the role of employee’s hope in managing consumer failure in the situation of consumer created emergencies.Design/methodology/approach Hypotheses were tested in three experiments that simulated service emergency across a general printing service situation and a travel service situation.Findings The study shows that: (1) FLE hope has a positive effect on consumer satisfaction, and is mediated by the consumer’s assumed effort by the FLE; (2) the effect of FLE hope on consumer satisfaction changes with changing levels of consumer hopefulness about the service outcome; (3) despite situation of consumer created emergency, consumer failure results in low consumer satisfaction due to attribution error and (4) external attribution by the FLE could not significantly rectify consumer’s attribution error and hence could not alleviate consumer dissatisfaction.Research limitations/implications The study suggests relevance and pathways of managing emotions and attributions of consumers and FLEs for superior performance outcomes.Originality/value The study theorizes and tests the role of hope, which is an important positive emotion during emergencies because frontline service settings have heretofore predominantly focused on managing negative traits and outcomes.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-01-2020-0007 [Google]

 

Nazifi, A., D. El-Manstrly, A. Tregear and K. Auxtova (2020): The impact of termination severity on customers’ emotional, attitudinal and behavioral reactions, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 31(1), pp.65-81

Purpose This paper empirically examines the direct and indirect effects of perceived termination severity on customers’ behavioral reactions via betrayal and justice. It also examines the moderating effects of attitude toward complaining (ATC).Design/methodology/approach This paper employs a quantitative method approach using a scenario-based experiment in a banking setting.Findings The results show that a more severe termination approach results in higher customer negative reactions. Betrayal is shown to be a key driver of customers’ behavioral reactions, and ATC moderates these effects.Research limitations/implications Future studies should examine the effects of different termination strategies in markedly different cultures and should also examine other boundary conditions such as prior warning, relationship quality and service importance in influencing customers’ negative behavioral responses.Originality/value This paper contributes to the service termination literature by shedding light on the impact of termination severity on customers’ reactions. It also unveils the mechanism that explains customers’ reactions to service termination. Further, it reveals that ATC moderates customers’ public (but not private) complaining behaviors.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-10-2019-0224 [Google]

 

Shulga Lenna, V. and A. Busser James (2020): Customer self-determination in value co-creation, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 31(1), pp.83-111

Purpose The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of consumers value collaboration with a service provider, specifically, how consumer self-determination affects value co-creation outcomes.Design/methodology/approach Self-determination theory (SDT) need-based motivational factors were operationalized in co-creation as commitment to resources (autonomy), feedback (competence) and collectives (relatedness). A between–within factorial experimental design (3 × 2 × 4) was conducted using online scenarios depicting value co-creation in a destination resort setting. Respondents were randomly and equally assigned to strong and weak SDT factor conditions. Next, they were exposed to scenarios depicting four types of value co-creation: co-innovation, co-creation of marketing, co-creation of experience and co-recovery, followed by an assessment of their co-created value (CCV), well-being, satisfaction and service advantage perceptions.Findings Results revealed that overall strong SDT conditions produce better outcomes. Consumers’ relatedness showed the strongest difference between strong and weak SDT conditions on the CCV dimensions. Further analysis revealed that autonomy and relatedness are crucial for collaboration. CCV meaningfulness is central for customers to improve their well-being, satisfaction and competitive advantage perceptions through co-creation.Originality/value The study contributes to a line of research on successful voluntary value co-creation processes between consumers and a company. The integration of service-dominant logic (SDL), axiology of value (AOV) and SDT, uniquely operationalized as commitment to resources as autonomy, feedback as competence and co-creation collective as relatedness offers a better understanding of how customers appraise the dimensions of CCV and outcomes of well-being, satisfaction and competitive advantage.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-05-2020-0093 [Google]

 

de Véricourt, F. and G. Perakis (2020): Frontiers in Service Science: The Management of Data Analytics Services: New Challenges and Future Directions, Service Science, 12(4), pp.121-129

In this short paper, we discuss the impact of data analytics in services and delineate future research directions for the field. After illustrating how data analytics are transforming different service sectors, we consider the provision of data analysis as a service in its own right. We discuss how the very nature of data and certain features of the machine learning method give rise to new issues and pitfalls for the management of these services, which delineates as many future research directions. We also discuss the coproduction of services by humans and machines and call for more research on responsible data analytics services to tackle some of the most pressing ethical issues in our societies.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2020.0262 [Google]

 

Jahandideh, H., J. W. Drew, F. Balestrieri and K. McCardle (2020): Individualized Pricing for a Cloud Provider Hosting Interactive Applications, Service Science, 12(4), pp.130-147

We consider a cloud provider that hosts interactive applications, such as mobile apps and online games. Depending on the traffic of users for an application, the provider commits a subset of its resources (hardware capacity) to serve the application. The provider must choose a dynamic pricing mechanism to indirectly select the applications hosted and maximize revenue. We model the provider?s pricing problem as a large-scale stochastic dynamic program. To approach this problem, we propose a tractable approach to enable decomposing the multidimensional stochastic dynamic program into single-dimensional subproblems. We then extend the proposed framework to define an individualized dynamic pricing mechanism for the cloud provider. We present novel upper bounds on the optimal revenue to evaluate the performance of our pricing mechanism. The computational results show that a contract-based model of selling interactive cloud services achieves significantly greater revenue than the prevalent alternative and that our pricing scheme attains near-optimal revenue.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2020.0264 [Google]

 

Jiao, Z., L. Ran, X. Liu, Y. Zhang and R. G. Qiu (2020): Integrating Price-Incentive and Trip-Selection Policies to Rebalance Shared Electric Vehicles, Service Science, 12(4), pp.148-173

Because electric vehicle sharing (EVS) offers the advantages of high flexibility and convenience, it has been receiving increasing attention worldwide as an effective approach to easing traffic congestion and environmental pollution. However, unbalanced electric vehicle distribution is an obstacle in the development of EVS. In this paper, we propose an integrated strategy to mitigate the imbalance issue and enhance customers? adoption of EVS. We construct an integrated strategy that combines the price-incentive approach with the trip-selection policy and models uncertain travel demand in a continuous trip-adopting process based on our integrated strategy. Aiming to improve EVS operating profits, we apply spatiotemporal nonlinear mixed-integer programming to formulate the travel pricing and rebalancing plan. Additionally, we approximate the model in a tractable form after analyzing the optimal service adoption and develop an efficient exact algorithm to handle the nonlinear items. The computational results of a real-world car2go Amsterdam case study demonstrate several economic and environmental benefits generated by our integrated policy, including (i) higher profits for EVS operators, (ii) improved service satisfaction for consumers, and (iii) a higher level of carbon emissions reduction, from 381 grams per mile to 225 grams per mile, beneficial for the social environment. Moreover, according to the case study, an appropriate initial fleet size, high rebalancing frequency, low labor cost, high potential travel demands, and short charging time also benefit EVS operation.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2020.0266 [Google]

 

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