Considered Service-specific journals were Journal of Service Research, Journal of Service Management, Journal of Services Marketing, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, Service Industries Journal, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, and Service Science.

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Peasley, M. C., J. T. Coleman and M. B. Royne (2018): Charitable motivations: the role of prestige and identification, Service Industries Journal, 38(43226), pp.265-281

The pinnacle of engagement for a nonprofit is a donation, yet as donations decline and competition increases, some nonprofits risk becoming obsolete. Why does an individual donate? What drives his or her decision? Two constructs are found to be vital in inducing action: prestige and identification. In an increasingly competitive landscape, we hypothesize that organizations can use prestige building activities as a critical strategy to an organization in achieving identification, thus increasing donations. The present study sheds light on the underlying mechanisms through which prestige effects on donation intentions materialize through the mediator of identification.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2017.1370457 [Google]

 

Echeverri, P. (2018): Co-creating sociality: organizational identity and marketing in voluntary organizations, Service Industries Journal, 38(43226), pp.282-302

A traditional understanding of voluntary organizations with a social mission is that they are offering social services. In this article, this understanding is argued to be misleading. In a study of 59 social voluntary organizations (SVOs) an alternative view is proposed. Instead of offering social services, these organizations co-create sociality and this is realized in collaboration with clients and in the contexts of social networks. This shift in understanding regarding what these organizations provide is mirrored in their marketing approach and managerial practice. The study is based on theory of organizational identity and service-dominant logic (S-D logic) and the findings advances our understanding of marketing approaches of SVOs, identifying the dialectical relation between organizational identity and managerial action, an organizational action embedded in integrative and excluding forces in the local society. The study also adds to research of transformative service research unfolding how service organizations create up-lifting services.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2017.1374373 [Google]

 

Modi, P. and G. K. Sahi (2018): The meaning and relevance of internal market orientation in nonprofit organisations, Service Industries Journal, 38(43226), pp.303-320

A large number of nonprofit organisations (NPOs) deliver welfare services in developing countries. Many find it difficult to retain their staff and to increase beneficiary satisfaction, which negatively affect their mission achievement activities. This research shows that internal market orientation (IMO) can help field-based NPOs address the managerial challenges. Towards this end, this research validates Lings and Greenley’s [(2005). Measuring internal market orientation. Journal of Service Research, 7(3), 290-305.] scale to measure IMO in field-based NPOs and establishes IMO’s relevance for them. Data from 370 NPOs were analysed using confirmatory factor analysis to validate the IMO construct in the nonprofit context and structural equation modelling to show that IMO improves beneficiary satisfaction and staff retention rates in NPOs. The study enhances our understanding of IMO in NPOs and offers important managerial implications.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2017.1376660 [Google]

 

Proença, T., J. F. Proença and C. Costa (2018): Enabling factors for developing a social services network, Service Industries Journal, 38(43226), pp.321-342

This paper discusses the main factors contributing to the development of networks between public, nonprofit and private organizations providing social services. Industrial marketing and purchasing literature was mobilized to analyze those networks, and a case study research was used to discuss how actors, activities and resources are interrelated to produce a collective and cooperative action to provide social services to population. The research has contributions for theory and practice. First, the ongoing interaction and exchange, through the implementation of collective activities leads to building ties and stable relationships that contribute to the mobilization of stakeholders. Second, the informality of interactions facilitates relationship building among stakeholders insofar as it facilitates the coordination and cooperation in the network, reinforcing trust relationships. Finally, performing collective activity requires that the actors interact, share resources, adapt their internal structures and develop interdependencies between actors, resources and activities, leading to the development of the perceived network value.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2017.1377189 [Google]

 

Banks, J. O. l. and M. M. Raciti (2018): Perceived fear, empathy and financial donations to charitable services, Service Industries Journal, 38(43226), pp.343-359

Charities are non-profit services that address diverse social needs. As securing financial donations is critical to their continued operation, they engage in a range of fund-raising activities. Central to successful fund-raising is understanding what motivates people to give money. Thus, this research investigates the role of donors’ perceived fear and empathy and how these influence the size of self-reported financial donations. Findings from the initial qualitative study (n = 32) informed the subsequent national quantitative main study (n = 400). Logistic regression revealed perceived fear and empathy as significant predictors, with perceived fear playing a lesser role and empathy playing a greater role in the self-reported donation of larger amounts of money to charities. These findings can assist charities with maximising their fund-raising efforts considering the growing competition for donors’ dollars, enabling them to provide a range of services which benefit society.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2017.1402888 [Google]

 

Barra, C. B., G. Pressgrove and E. Torres (2018): Trust and commitment in the formation of donor loyalty, Service Industries Journal, 38(43226), pp.360-377

This cross-national study empirically tests a model that explains the ways in which trust and commitment lead to loyalty in the organization-donor relationship. This research fills a gap in the literature by contrasting the formation of loyalty in a developing nation, with the national culture in which the framework was initially developed. Findings indicate that while trust and commitment are significant in the formation of behavioral loyalty in both Latin America and the United States, this relationship is mediated by cognitive and affective loyalty. The respective contributions of affective and cognitive loyalty are, however, different based on cultural context. In Latin America, the model is more affectively focused, whereas in the United States it is more cognitively focused. Theoretical, practical and managerial implications are discussed.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/02642069.2017.1405937 [Google]

 

Sreejesh, S., S. Juhi Gahlot, S. Abhigyan, E. Abdolreza and M. R. Anusree (2017): The impact of other customer perception on consumer-brand relationships, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 28(2), pp.130-146

Purpose Extant research evidence demonstrates that customer satisfaction in a service encounter is influenced by other customer perception (OCP). However, scholarly research on the impact of OCP on brand love and the moderating influence of customers? attachment styles in the context of hospitality industry is scarce. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap in the literature. Design/methodology/approach The data were collected from customers of five and three-star hotels in India. Regression-based process analysis (Hayes, 2013) was used to test the proposed set of hypotheses. Findings The data analysis shows that OCP predicts brand love through the mediation of satisfaction. Individual?s anxious attachment style positively moderates ?other customer perception-satisfaction? relationship, and avoidant attachment style negatively moderates the same relationship. Thus the effect of OCP is positively moderated by anxious attachment style, and negatively moderated by avoidant attachment style. Originality/value The value of this study lies in quantitatively investigating the roles played by OCP and individual attachment styles in shaping brand love in hospitality industry. In contrast to findings from previous research, the findings from this study suggest that anxious attachment style positively influences brand satisfaction and formation of brand love.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-11-2016-0207 [Google]

 

Kristina, H. (2017): Positive and negative valence influencing consumer engagement, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 28(2), pp.147-169

Purpose The current service landscape is increasingly dynamic, and consumers? engagement in market-related behavior is constantly changing. Developments in technology further influence this continuous dynamism. Therefore, it is important to understand the factors that may cause different engagement valence, especially as only some consumers actively engage in online platforms. The purpose of this paper is to characterize factors that positively and negatively influence consumer engagement and suggest theoretical and managerial implications for the different factors that determine consumer engagement. Design/methodology/approach This paper conceptualizes factors that influence consumer engagement based on their characteristics (behavioral, emotional, and cognitive) and the type of influence (positive or negative). The study uses customer-dominant logic of service, which focuses on emancipated customers and idiosyncratic customer logic, rather than on provider-orchestrated customer experiences of brands, firms, or offerings. An abductive research approach is used to qualitatively explore consumer engagement in the context of online interest communities. Findings The study identifies the behavioral, emotional, and cognitive factors that positively and negatively determine consumer engagement in the context of online interest communities. Research limitations/implications Through the focus on customer logic, the study provides a detailed and nuanced view of factors that influence consumer engagement. Future research is needed to explore how this framework can be applied to other online communities and different service contexts. Practical implications The paper provides insights into the presence of an interest area in consumers? lives. The study indicates how firms may be involved in consumers? lives and how firms may create successful customer relationships based on consumer engagement. Originality/value This study enhances previous research in four ways: by characterizing factors that determine engagement, paying particular attention to its negatively valenced factors and examining the interplay of the factors that positively and negatively influence engagement, by describing consumers? connection to the interest area instead of positioning the brand as the link between the consumers and the provider, and by discussing the theoretical and practical challenges associated with understanding and managing consumer engagement.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-02-2016-0020 [Google]

 

Yen-Chun, C., R. Adriana Amaya and W. Wann-Yih (2017): Exploring the determinants and consequences of salesperson market orientation behavior: An empirical study in the financial service industry, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 28(2), pp.170-195

Purpose While the importance of salesperson market orientation behavior (SMOB) is widely acknowledged, as evidenced by the increasing research attention this concept is receiving, discussion of its antecedents and consequences in the literature remains limited. The purpose of this paper is to focus on the antecedents of SMOB and the underlying process through which it influences sales performance. Design/methodology/approach A causal model was developed to analyze the antecedents and consequences of SMOB. This proposed model and various hypotheses were tested using data obtained from a sample of 264 salespeople in the Taiwanese financial services industry. Findings The learning orientation and behavioral controls of salespeople positively influence SMOB. In addition, SMOB plays a critical role in improving two types of ?working-smart? behaviors (i.e., sales planning and adaptive selling), thereby achieving better sales performance. Originality/value This report sheds light on the importance of SMOB in today?s personal sales environment and uncovers the underlying mechanisms through which SMOB contributes to sales performance. It also offers specific guidelines for the assessment and management of SMOB to enhance the performance of salespeople within the financial services industry.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-02-2016-0035 [Google]

 

Asbjørn, F. and K. Knut (2018): Customer journeys: a systematic literature review, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 28(2), pp.196-227

Purpose Customer journeys have become an increasingly important topic in service management and design. The purpose of this paper is to review customer journey terminology and approaches within the research literature prior to 2013, mainly from the fields of design, management, and marketing. Design/methodology/approach The study was conducted as a systematic literature review. Searches in Google Scholar, Scopus, Web of Knowledge, ACM Digital Library, and ScienceDirect identified 45 papers for the analysis. The papers were analyzed with respect to customer journey terminology and approaches, the relation to customer experience, the referenced background, and the use of visualizations. Findings Across the reviewed literature, customer journeys are described not only as a means to take the viewpoint of the customer, but also to reach insight into their experiences. A rich and at times incoherent customer journey terminology is analyzed and discussed, as are two emerging customer journey approaches: customer journey mapping (analysis of a service process ?as is?) and customer journey proposition (generative activities leading toward a possible service ?to be?). Research limitations/implications The review is limited to analyzing and making claims on research papers that explicitly apply the term customer journey. In most of the reviewed papers, customer journeys are not the main object of interest but are discussed as one of several topics. Practical implications A nuanced discussion of customer journey terminology and approaches is provided, supporting the practical application of a customer journey perspective. Originality/value The review contributes a needed common basis for future customer journey research and practice.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-11-2014-0261 [Google]

 

Zizhen, G., L. Caifeng, B. Kejia, Z. Haiping and Y. Xia (2018): Motivating service employee creativity: regulatory focus and emotional labour, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 28(2), pp.228-249

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to advance our understanding of the roles that service employees? responses to high job demands play in service innovation, by examining the effects that service employees? motivational orientation in self-regulation (regulatory focus) and their emotional labour strategy have on their creativity. Design/methodology/approach By integrating regulatory focus theory and emotion regulation theory, the authors developed a theoretical model to propose the links between promotion and prevention regulatory foci, different emotional labour strategies and frontline employee creativity. The research hypotheses were tested using hierarchical linear model based on data collected from 304 frontline employees and 72 supervisors in 51 restaurants. Findings The results showed that promotion focus was positively related to frontline employee creativity while prevention focus was negatively related to it. In addition, both emotional labour strategies (deep acting and surface acting) mediated the effect of promotion focus on frontline employee creativity. Surface acting mediated the effect of prevention focus on frontline employee creativity. Originality/value This is the first research conducted to explain, from a self-regulatory perspective, the influence that is exerted on service employees? service innovation by their responses to high job demands. The findings identify the effects that service employees? promotion focus or prevention focus in self-regulation have on their creativity, and the data unravel the role of emotional labour strategy as the mediating mechanism that explains the influence of regulatory focus on service employee creativity. On the basis of the findings, managerial directions are offered with regard to managing service employees? regulatory focus and emotional labour, with a view to enhancing the creativity and innovation within a service organisation.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-11-2016-0214 [Google]

 

Laszlo, S. and C. Yit Sean (2018): Activating multiple roles of customer-firm relationships in service failures, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 28(2), pp.250-270

Purpose Scholars have proposed that the negative effects of service failures can be countered by developing and maintaining high quality customer-company relationships or by providing excellent service recovery to customers. While both strategies have been proposed as ways to overcome the negative effects of service failures, there are only a limited number of studies that have examined their joint effects. The purpose of this paper is to fill this gap by investigating the impact of these two strategies jointly on rumination (brooding and reflection), anger and customer forgiveness (revenge, avoidance and benevolence). Design/methodology/approach The experimental design used in this study is an adaptation of Mattila?s (2001) research design, which manipulated both the level of service recovery and relationship. A total of 677 respondents were assigned randomly to one of the six experimental conditions. Multi-group structural equation modeling was employed to estimate the proposed model across three relational conditions. Findings This study suggests that the buffering effects are directly triggered by the impact of relationships, whereas, the magnifying effects are primarily related to the customer?s cognitive processes. This study reveals multiple forms of concurrent buffering and magnifying effects in service failures. Originality/value The findings of the study led to a classification system of the various forms of buffering and magnifying effects of relationships in the event of service failures. The four active roles of relationships are identified as damage control, benefit catalyst, benefit attenuator and damage catalyst. This proposed typology breaks new ground for theorizing about relationship utilization in negative incidents.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-07-2017-0105 [Google]

 

Sharafi, A., A. A. Taleizadeh and M. S. Amalnick (2018): Fair Allocation in Financial Disputes Between Public–Private Partnership Stakeholders Using Game Theory, Service Science, 10(1), pp.1-11

Long-term contracts along with their various internal and external variables lead to inevitable changes in the financial estimation of public?private partnership (PPP) projects. In these cases, and during renegotiations, the excess of benefit/cost should be shared among the key stakeholders, including the private contractor, government, and end users, in terms of contract extensions, annual subsidies, and tariff adjustments, respectively. However, while the allocation of excess befit/cost is an important factor in the successful execution of PPP projects, few methods have considered this issue. Moreover, these methods have rarely involved all three stakeholders and often have evaluated a limited number of possible solutions by qualitative techniques. To address the fair allocation of excess benefit/cost, this paper investigates some sharing mechanisms based on cooperative game concepts, including the core, the nucleolus, and the Shapley value. These mechanisms can improve the renegotiation regulations in PPP contracts and help decision makers manage renegotiations with better structure and supervision. The proposed allocation mechanisms are shown to be fair and practical approaches to managing the financial viability in PPP contracts.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2017.0179 [Google]

 

Nowicki, D., B. Sauser, W. Randall and R. Lusch (2018): Service-Dominant Logic and Performance-Based Contracting: A Systems Thinking Perspective, Service Science, 10(1), pp.12-24

This paper extends recent theoretical advances by merging service-dominant logic (S-D logic) and performance-based contracting (PBC). S-D logic is a conceptual frame of reference that defines supply chain knowledge and skill as its fundamental building blocks of strategic benefit. Cocreation of value between actors and beneficiaries is central to S-D logic and is measured through performance outcomes. PBC is a transformational departure from traditional supply chain strategies that focuses on delivering performance instead of goods and services. PBC has found increasing use in large-scale complex systems where the postproduction costs exceed the production cost, such as defense, transportation, and healthcare. These systems are commonly called sustainment-dominated systems (SDSs). We use systems theory and the Boardman Soft Systems Methodology to develop a systemigram that corresponds to the 11 foundational premises of S-D logic in the context of PBC. We also verify the use of the systemigram as an instrument to instantiate systems thinking and move S-D logic from an abstract framework to a more actionable framework. This paper provides managers and researchers a systematic insight into how investment into knowledge, skills, and the cocreation of value can drive improved SDS life-cycle affordability in the context of PBC.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2017.0185 [Google]

 

Ojasalo, J. and K. Ojasalo (2018): Lean Service Innovation, Service Science, 10(1), pp.25-39

The purpose of this paper is to propose an approach to lean service innovation. The knowledge gap relates to three specific challenges of service innovation: early identification of the core customer value with business potential, in-depth understanding of customer value for new or potential customers, and discovery and utilization of latent customer needs. As a result, this article introduces a model of lean service innovation. The model focuses on the process rather than on single cocreation methods. The model shows how a new service can iteratively be developed through several improvement rounds into a final service, and each round increases the company?s understanding of customer value and capability to better integrate resources for this. Both the theoretical domain and the application of service-dominant logic can be extended with the lean service innovation approach introduced here. It shows the process of in-depth learning with customers and the rapid prototyping of a service. It facilitates early identification of the core customer value with business potential in the innovation process, identification of customer value for new or potential customers, and discovery and utilization of latent customer needs in innovation. It illustrates repeated experimentation and improvement of service with customers and ultimately supports the implementation of service-dominant logic in innovation.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2017.0194 [Google]

 

Davis, M. J., Y. Lu, M. Sharma, M. S. Squillante and B. Zhang (2018): Stochastic Optimization Models for Workforce Planning, Operations, and Risk Management, Service Science, 10(1), pp.40-57

A framework for unified decision making under uncertainty that supports financial planning, operations management, and risk management for workforce applications is proposed and analyzed. The management of enterprise workforce is conducted at the granularity of cohorts of individuals with similar attributes of interest. A time inhomogeneous Markov chain is developed to model the evolution of these cohorts over time. Stochastic control problems based on versions of the controlled Markov chain are formulated to maximize profit under a set of workforce decisions. Extensive data analysis and innovative computational approaches enable us to solve these stochastic control problems for large-scale systems, with real-world business case studies demonstrating the use of this unified decision support capability for large-scale enterprises.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2017.0199 [Google]

 

Ashouri, M., K. Cai, F. Lin and G. Shmueli (2018): Assessing the Value of an Information System for Developing Predictive Analytics: The Case of Forecasting School-Level Demand in Taiwan, Service Science, 10(1), pp.58-75

Analytics is important for education planning. Deploying forecasting analytics requires management information systems (MISs) that collect the needed data and deliver the forecasts to stakeholders. A critical question is whether the data collected by a system is adequate for producing the analytics for decision making. We describe the case of a new education MIS in Taiwan, where the population of preschool children in different school districts is constantly changing. These changes challenge school resource planning, especially in terms of teacher hiring. The bureaus of education in charge of resource allocation are in need of accurate school-level one-to-five-year-ahead forecasts of the number of incoming first-grade classrooms. The Ministry of Education therefore launched a K?9 student data management system (k9sdms) that allows schools to directly update data on existing and prospective students. We evaluate whether using this system supports the goal of generating one-to-five-year-ahead forecasts, thereby assessing the value of the MIS for its intended usage. Using data until 2014, we developed a forecasting model for the number of first-grade classrooms at each school in Taiwan in 2015?2019. The quality of forecasts shows that k9sdms can produce valuable results, thereby achieving its purpose.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2017.0200 [Google]

 

Patrício, L., N. F. de Pinho, J. G. Teixeira and R. P. Fisk (2018): Service Design for Value Networks: Enabling Value Cocreation Interactions in Healthcare, Service Science, 10(1), pp.76-97

In the increasingly complex service environment, value is cocreated through webs of interactions between provider networks and customer networks. This is evident in healthcare services, where well-being can be achieved only through the joint efforts of professional healthcare networks and patient networks. Addressing the challenge of creating network-level services, the service design for value networks (SD4VN) method designs services as enablers of many-to-many value cocreating interactions among network actors. By integrating previous research on value networks and service design, SD4VN develops a process and a set of models beyond supporting dyadic (customer?service provider) interactions to understanding the interrelated activities, interactions, and goals of network actors and designing services to support the different actors in reaching their goals with balanced centricity. Following a design science research approach, this paper presents the SD4VN method and reports on a case application of the method used to design the Portuguese national electronic health record service Plataforma de Dados da Saúde (PDS). The case application involved focus groups, in-depth interviews, and participatory design sessions with over 170 participants at different service design stages, showing the importance of designing a balanced, integrated service. The case application also shows how SD4VN can support a wider adoption of the service and improve the health service system.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2017.0201 [Google]

 

Demirkan, H. and J. C. Spohrer (2018): Commentary—Cultivating T-Shaped Professionals in the Era of Digital Transformation, Service Science, 10(1), pp.98-109

As a result of the rapid growth of urban populations and use of smartphones, the new millennium has ushered in an age of unprecedented levels of collaborative and competitive local and global relations, constantly reshaped by advances in science, public policy, technology platforms, and open practices. The dynamic nature of these open innovation-oriented relationships is not sufficiently incorporated into and addressed by conventional education systems. Today?s digital talents are still primarily siloed in functions and disciplines that were designed to meet the needs of an earlier era. Current rewards and incentives are also focused along these lines. Consequently, traditional academics are encouraged to delve deeper within their areas of specialization rather than reach out to colleagues in other disciplines to develop transdisciplinary research agendas. Across all sectors, the new digital millennium requires new types of professionals and work practices as well as new types of citizens and social practices. To help people be successful in this dynamic environment of rapidly changing smart service systems, should the education systems of the future encourage hyperspecialization, hyperflexibility, or something else? In this commentary, we make the case for an education system that encourages the development of T-shaped digital professionals and citizens?future-ready innovators who uniquely combine specialization (critical thinking and problem-solving depth) and flexibility (empathy, breadth of knowledge, skills, experience, and complex communication abilities) and who also use smart machines as assistants. This combination of personal capabilities allows for rapid formation of high-performance teams working in open innovation environments to build smarter service systems.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/serv.2017.0204 [Google]

 

 

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