Today we identify service articles published in Marketing, Management, Operations, Productions, Information Systems & Practioner-oriented Journals in February 2017.

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Meyners, J., C. Barrot, J. U. Becker and J. Goldenberg (2017): The Role of Mere Closeness: How Geographic Proximity Affects Social Influence, Journal of Marketing, 81(5), pp.49-66

Geographic proximity has become increasingly relevant due to the growing number of marketing services that use consumers’ geographic locations, thus increasing the importance of gaining insights from this information. In five studies (both field and experimental), the authors analyze the effect of geographic proximity on social influence and demonstrate that not only social proximity but also perceived homophily can trigger social influence. They find that this effect holds under alternative representations of geographic distance and is confirmed for a range of different services and even for physical goods. Furthermore, the authors show that geographic proximity has a relative effect because the social influence of a closer sender is stronger than that of a more distant sender, regardless of the absolute distances. They present managerially relevant conditions under which the influence of geographic proximity not only is comparable to other types of information such as age or gender but also provides sufficient informational value for customers to offset differences among alternatives (e.g., due to higher prices) in trade-off decisions.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/ [Google]

 

Dion, D. and S. Borraz (2017): Managing Status: How Luxury Brands Shape Class Subjectivities in the Service Encounter, Journal of Marketing, 81(5), pp.67-85

Although a large body of research has investigated how consumers use goods to signal their status, little is known about how brands manage status. The very few studies that have examined this topic are grounded in the traditional conception of status and focus on the possession and display of status signals. The authors offer an alternative understanding of status management by investigating the role of interactions in the service encounter. Drawing from extensive ethnographic work in luxury stores, they investigate how brands (re)configure the status games that surface in the service encounter. They show that through the material and social cues of the servicescape, brands shape consumers’ class subjectivities—that is, they make consumers behave as class subjects who have a specific understanding of their position in the social hierarchy. Thus, managing status requires the active creation and management of consumers as class subjects. There is a shift from managing branded goods that signal status to managing customer experiences that make consumers enact status positions. This research helps identify new ways to manage status brands, especially luxury brands.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/ [Google]

 

Becerril-Arreola, R., C. Zhou, R. Srinivasan and D. Seldin (2017): Service Satisfaction–Market Share Relationships in Partnered Hybrid Offerings, Journal of Marketing, 81(5), pp.86-103

Many goods manufacturers and service providers jointly deliver partnered hybrid offerings to achieve competitive advantage and superior performance. In such cases, service providers may emphasize different aspects of service in their offerings. Do service providers and goods manufacturers benefit equally from emphasizing service satisfaction? Do the performance effects of emphases on different aspects of service satisfaction vary across different goods? The authors examine the effects of emphases on two aspects of service satisfaction, relational service (interactions with the service provider’s staff) and service environment (service provider’s facilities), on the market shares of service and goods components of partnered hybrid offerings. Using multiple secondary data sources from the U.S. automobile industry between 2009 and 2015, the authors find that emphasizing relational service satisfaction increases service market share but decreases goods market share. Counterintuitively, emphasizing service environment satisfaction decreases service market share. Furthermore, the vertical quality of the good moderates these relationships. The findings generate actionable guidelines to improve market shares by adjusting relational service satisfaction and service environment satisfaction in the partnered hybrid offerings context.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/ [Google]

 

Zervas, G., D. Proserpio and J. W. Byers (2017): The Rise of the Sharing Economy: Estimating the Impact of Airbnb on the Hotel Industry, Journal of Marketing Research (JMR), 54(5), pp.687-705

Peer-to-peer markets, collectively known as the sharing economy, have emerged as alternative suppliers of goods and services traditionally provided by long-established industries. The authors explore the economic impact of the sharing economy on incumbent firms by studying the case of Airbnb, a prominent platform for short-term accommodations. They analyze Airbnb’s entry into the state of Texas and quantify its impact on the Texas hotel industry over the subsequent decade. In Austin, where Airbnb supply is highest, the causal impact on hotel revenue is in the 8%–10% range; moreover, the impact is nonuniform, with lower-priced hotels and hotels that do not cater to business travelers being the most affected. The impact manifests itself primarily through less aggressive hotel room pricing, benefiting all consumers, not just participants in the sharing economy. The price response is especially pronounced during periods of peak demand, such as during the South by Southwest festival, and is due to a differentiating feature of peer-to-peer platforms—enabling instantaneous supply to scale to meet demand.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/ [Google]

 

Rasoulian, S., Y. Grégoire, R. Legoux and S. Sénécal (2017): Service crisis recovery and firm performance: insights from information breach announcements, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 45(6), pp.789-806

The extant literature has studied the effects of a firm’s service recovery efforts on the reactions of customers and employees following an individual service failure. However, the impact of recovery efforts on a firm’s performance after a public and large service failure-such as a large-scale information breach-has received scant attention. To address this gap, this current research develops a framework and finds support for the impact of service crisis recoveries on a firm’s performance, as measured by firm-idiosyncratic risk. Using a unique dataset of service crisis recoveries, the authors find that firms offering compensation (i.e., tangible redresses) or process improvement (i.e., improvements in organizational processes) show more stable performance (less idiosyncratic risk), from two quarters to two calendar years after the announcement of their recovery plan. In line with the documented dual effect of apologies, firms that offer apology-based recoveries display more volatile performance (higher idiosyncratic risk). Of note, this volatility increases with the number of affected individuals, and it remains unaffected even when the apology is expressed with high intensity.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11747-017-0543-8 [Google]

 

Umashankar, N., Y. Bhagwat and V. Kumar (2017): Do loyal customers really pay more for services?, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 45(6), pp.807-826

Service firms are encouraged by historic evidence that loyal customers are less price sensitive. Yet, some research has challenged the assertion while others have demonstrated considerable heterogeneity within loyal segments. Aiming to reconcile this debate, we investigate the relationship between customers’ behavioral loyalty and the importance they place on price relative to two managerially relevant service attributes: rewards and convenience. We also assess the moderating role of attitudinal loyalty resulting from superior service experience. Results from a longitudinal survey and transaction data from an airline carrier show that as customers’ behavioral loyalty increases, they place more importance on price and less importance on rewards and convenience, revealing that behavioral loyalty causes a shift in emphasis toward price. As a result, behaviorally loyal customers spend less and revenue decreases. However, by improving attitudinal loyalty, firms achieve the desired outcome of reducing price sensitivity and increasing revenue. Specifically, after experiencing better service, behaviorally loyal customers focus less on price and instead shift their focus toward rewards and convenience, and this results in revenue gains for the firm. Overall, attitudinal loyalty from better service experience acts as a key mitigator of the positive link between behavioral loyalty and price sensitivity.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11747-016-0491-8 [Google]

 

Albrecht, A., G. Walsh, S. Brach, D. Gremler and E. Herpen (2017): The influence of service employees and other customers on customer unfriendliness: a social norms perspective, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 45(6), pp.827-847

This research investigates the influence that social sources in the service environment exert on customer unfriendliness. Drawing on social norms theory, the authors demonstrate that descriptive norms (i.e., what most people are perceived to be doing in a certain situation), in the form of unfriendliness by service employees and fellow customers, predicts customers’ unfriendliness toward employees. Injunctive norms (i.e., beliefs about which behaviors are approved by important others) and identification with fellow customers exert moderating effects. Specifically, strong injunctive norms can buffer the effect of descriptive norms. Furthermore, fellow customers influence a customer’s unfriendliness only if he or she identifies either very strongly or very weakly with them. By clarifying the role of norms in service encounters, this study provides insights on when unfriendly customer behavior is likely to occur. Managerial implications for companies who want to diminish customer unfriendliness are discussed.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11747-016-0505-6 [Google]

 

Ding, Y. and H. T. Keh (2017): Consumer reliance on intangible versus tangible attributes in service evaluation: the role of construal level, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 45(6), pp.848-865

The services marketing literature has traditionally characterized intangibility as the most critical distinction between services and goods, but in practice service production and consumption often involve both intangible and tangible elements. While prior research has examined and debated service intangibility from the firm’s perspective, what is missing is an understanding of how consumers weigh the relative importance of intangible versus tangible attributes in their service evaluation. Drawing on construal level theory, the authors propose that consumers with a high (vs. low) construal level rely more on intangible (vs. tangible) attributes in service evaluation. Furthermore, the effect of construal level on service evaluation is mediated by imagery vividness, with service type (e.g., experience vs. credence services) serving as a boundary condition. The authors conduct two field studies and two lab experiments and find that under a high construal level, consumers rely more on intangible attributes in their service evaluation and choice formation; under a low construal level, consumers rely more on tangible attributes in their service evaluation and choice. The findings not only offer new insights to help reconcile the disparate perspectives on service intangibility in the literature but also have practical implications on service firms’ positioning strategies that vary across time (e.g., advance selling vs. on-site selling) and space (e.g., near vs. distant outlet), as well as which attributes to emphasize in their marketing communications.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11747-017-0527-8 [Google]

 

Hogreve, J., N. Bilstein and L. Mandl (2017): Unveiling the recovery time zone of tolerance: when time matters in service recovery, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 45(6), pp.866-883

This article examines the link between recovery time and customer compensation expectations for service failures that cannot be immediately redressed. First, we show that the relationship between recovery time and compensation expectations is nonlinear. Initially, in a recovery time zone of tolerance, compensation expectations do not increase. Beyond this zone, the relationship follows an inverted U-shape, such that compensation expectations first increase but decrease in the long run. Second, our results show that long recovery times are accompanied by additional negative effects, including lower satisfaction with the recovery and negative word of mouth, so postponing service recovery represents a poor option. Third, relationship strength functions as a moderator. First-time customers expect higher compensation earlier; relational customers display a recovery time zone of tolerance but claim considerably higher compensations afterwards. Fourth, communication initiatives like the separate provision of status updates or an explanation may limit increases in compensation expectations over time. Still, their joint usage creates a ‘too-much-of-a-good-thing’ effect, suggesting that if the usage of communication initiatives is taken too far it may lead to negative outcomes such as increasing compensation expectations.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11747-017-0544-7 [Google]

 

Hilken, T., K. de Ruyter, M. Chylinski, D. Mahr and D. Keeling (2017): Augmenting the eye of the beholder: exploring the strategic potential of augmented reality to enhance online service experiences, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 45(6), pp.884-905

Driven by the proliferation of augmented reality (AR) technologies, many firms are pursuing a strategy of service augmentation to enhance customers’ online service experiences. Drawing on situated cognition theory, the authors show that AR-based service augmentation enhances customer value perceptions by simultaneously providing simulated physical control and environmental embedding. The resulting authentic situated experience, manifested in a feeling of spatial presence, functions as a mediator and also predicts customer decision comfort. Furthermore, the effect of spatial presence on utilitarian value perceptions is greater for customers who are disposed toward verbal rather than visual information processing, and the positive effect on decision comfort is attenuated by customers’ privacy concerns.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11747-017-0541-x [Google]

 

Huang, M.-H. and R. Rust (2017): Technology-driven service strategy, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 45(6), pp.906-924

Advancements in technology are radically transforming service, and increasingly providing the underlying basis for service strategy. In this paper, we develop a typology and positioning map for service strategy, in the context of rapid technological change, and outline the process for firms to position or reposition their service strategies. Which strategy to choose is based on the degree to which customer demand is heterogeneous, and the degree to which potential customer lifetime value varies across customers. This results in four strategies: the McService strategy that is standardized and transactional, the Relational Service strategy that is standardized and relational, the Customized Transaction strategy that is personalized and transactional, and the Adaptive Personalization strategy that is personalized and relational. We provide firms a roadmap for identifying a ‘sweet spot’ strategy in relation to a segment’s realized or potential customer lifetime value, combined with the firm’s technological capabilities. Because technological capabilities inevitably advance, firms will tend to move from standardized to personalized and from transactional to relational over time, implying that firms should be alert to technological opportunities to personalize their relationships with customers. Our strategic framework also produces a useful bridge from marketing practice to the conceptual evolution of the service literature, showing how the historical trends toward continuing customer relationships and co-productive personalization should drive strategic thinking in service.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11747-017-0545-6 [Google]

 

Wieland, H., N. Hartmann and S. Vargo (2017): Business models as service strategy, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 45(6), pp.925-943

It is widely recognized that business models can serve as important strategic tools in innovation and market formation processes. Consequently, business models should have a prominent position in the marketing literature. However, marketing scholars have, so far, paid little attention to the business model concept, perhaps because it lacks an established definition and clear theoretical foundation. This article offers a definition for the business model concept that, using a fractal approach, connects business models to technological and market innovation. Furthermore, the article questions several cornerstone strategic concepts by reconceptualizing business model development from a firm-centric activity that promotes owning key resources and altering sets of decision variables to one that highlights the facilitation of broad institutional change processes. As such, it takes the potentially controversial position of advocating a service-strategy-based understanding of business models for all of marketing strategy.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11747-017-0531-z [Google]

 

Dong, B. and K. Sivakumar (2017): Customer participation in services: domain, scope, and boundaries, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 45(6), pp.944-965

Extant service research considers several aspects of customer participation (CP) but lacks a clear and inclusive typology that delineates CP’s domain, scope, or boundaries. To address this gap, the authors build on a review of extant literature and propose a typology to classify CP into three categories-mandatory, replaceable, and voluntary. They demonstrate how this proposed typology improves the conceptual and empirical clarity of CP research. More specifically, the authors (1) suggest using ‘customer participation’ to replace other terminologies such as coproduction and cocreation to reduce confusion; (2) conceptualize CP, customer engagement, and customer innovation as related but distinct concepts; (3) use the proposed typology to extend existing conceptualizations, integrate prior empirical research, and reconcile conflicting findings. Building on the enhanced conceptual clarity, managerial implications and future research directions are discussed.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11747-017-0524-y [Google]

 

Batt, R. J. and C. Terwiesch (2017): Early Task Initiation and Other Load-Adaptive Mechanisms in the Emergency Department, Management Science, 63(11), pp.3531-3551

We study a multistage service process that adapts to system occupancy level. Using operational data from more than 140,000 patient visits to a hospital emergency department, we show that the system-level performance of the emergency department is an aggregation of several simultaneous server-level workload response mechanisms. We identify early task initiation as a between-stage adaptive response mechanism that occurs when an upstream stage initiates tasks that are normally handled by a downstream stage. We show that having some diagnostic tests ordered during the triage process reduces treatment time by 20 minutes, on average. However, ordering too many tests at triage can lead to an increase in the total number of tests performed on the patient. We also demonstrate the presence of other response mechanisms such as queuing delays for tasks such as medication delivery, and rushing as nurses spend less time with their patients when the queue length is high. This paper was accepted by Serguei Netessine, operations management.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2016.2516 [Google]

 

Lu, S. F. and L. X. Lu (2017): Do Mandatory Overtime Laws Improve Quality? Staffing Decisions and Operational Flexibility of Nursing Homes, Management Science, 63(11), pp.3566-3585

During the 2000s, over a dozen U.S. states passed laws that prohibit healthcare employers from mandating overtime for nurses. Using a nationwide panel data set from 2004 to 2012, we find that these mandatory overtime laws reduced the service quality of nursing homes, as measured by an increase in deficiency citations. This outcome can be explained by two undesirable changes in the staffing hours of registered nurses: decreased hours of permanent nurses and increased hours of contract nurses per resident day. We observe that the increase in deficiency citations concentrates in the domains of administration and quality of care rather than quality of life, and the severity levels of the increased citations tend to be minor rather than major. We also find that the laws’ negative effect on quality is more severe in nursing homes with higher percentages of Medicare-covered residents. These observations are consistent with the predictions of a stochastic staffing model that incorporates demand uncertainty and operational flexibility. Furthermore, we rule out an alternative hypothesis that the quality decline is induced by an increase in nurse wages. This paper was accepted by Gad Allon, operations management.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2016.2523 [Google]

 

Zacharias, C. and M. Armony (2017): Joint Panel Sizing and Appointment Scheduling in Outpatient Care, Management Science, 63(11), pp.3978-3997

Patients nationwide experience difficulties in accessing medical care in a timely manner due to long backlogs of appointments. Medical practices aim to utilize their valuable resources efficiently, deliver timely access to care, and at the same time they strive to provide short waiting times for patients present at the medical facility. We address the joint problem of determining the panel size of a medical practice and the number of offered appointment slots per day, so that patients do not face long backlogs and the clinic is not overcrowded. We explicitly model the two time scales involved in accessing medical care: appointment delay (order of days, weeks) and clinic delay (order of minutes, hours). Closed-form expressions are derived for the performance measures of interest based on diffusion approximations. Our model captures many features of the complex reality of outpatient care, including patient no-shows, balking behavior, and random service times. Our analysis provides theoretical and numerical support for the optimality of an ‘open access’ policy in outpatient scheduling when we account for both types of delay, and it demonstrates the importance of considering panel sizing and scheduling decisions in a joint framework. This paper was accepted by Noah Gans, stochastic models and simulation.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2016.2532 [Google]

 

Freeman, M., N. Savva and S. Scholtes (2017): Gatekeepers at Work: An Empirical Analysis of a Maternity Unit, Management Science, 63(10), pp.3147-3167

We use a detailed operational and clinical data set from a maternity hospital to investigate how workload affects decisions in gatekeeper-provider systems, where the servers act as gatekeepers to specialists but may also attempt to serve customers themselves, albeit with a probability of success that is decreasing in the complexity of the customers’ needs. We study the effect of workload during a service episode on gatekeepers’ service configuration decisions and the rate at which gatekeepers refer customers to a specialist. We find that gatekeeper-providers (midwives in our context) make substantial use of two levers to manage their workload (measured as patients per midwife): they ration resource-intensive discretionary services (epidural analgesia) for customers with noncomplex service needs (mothers with spontaneous onset of labor) and, at the same time, increase the rate of specialist referral (physician-led delivery) for customers with complex needs (mothers with pharmacologically induced labor). The workload effect in the study unit is surprisingly large and comparable in size to those for leading clinical risk factors: when workload increases from two standard deviations below to two standard deviations above the mean, noncomplex cases are 28.8% less likely to receive an epidural, leading to a cost reduction of 8.7%, while complex cases are 14.2% more likely to be referred for a physician-led delivery, leading to a cost increase of 2.6%. These observations are consistent with overtreatment at both high and low workload levels, albeit for different types of patients, and suggest that smoothing gatekeeper workload would reduce variability in customer service experience. This paper was accepted by Serguei Netessine, operations management.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2016.2512 [Google]

 

Lee, Y. S. and E. Siemsen (2017): Task Decomposition and Newsvendor Decision Making, Management Science, 63(10), pp.3226-3245

We conduct three behavioral laboratory experiments to compare newsvendor order decisions placed directly to order decisions submitted in a decomposed way by soliciting point forecasts, uncertainty estimates, and service-level decisions. Decomposing order decisions in such a way often follows from organizational structure and can lead to performance improvements compared with ordering directly. However, we also demonstrate that if the critical ratio is below 50%, or if the underlying demand uncertainty is too high, task decomposition may not be preferred to direct ordering. Under such conditions, decision makers are prone to set service levels too high or to suffer from excessive random judgment error, which reduces the efficacy of task decomposition. We further demonstrate that if accompanied by decision support in the form of suggested quantities, task decomposition becomes the better-performing approach to newsvendor decision making more generally. Decision support and task decomposition therefore appear as complementary methods to improve decision performance in the newsvendor context. This paper was accepted by Serguei Netessine, operations management.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2016.2521 [Google]

 

Anderson, M. L. and F. Lu (2017): Learning to Manage and Managing to Learn: The Effects of Student Leadership Service, Management Science, 63(10), pp.3246-3261

Employers and colleges value individuals with leadership service, but there is limited evidence on whether leadership service itself creates skills. Identification in this context has proved difficult because settings in which leadership service accrues to individuals for ostensibly random reasons are rare. In this study we estimate the effects of random assignment to classroom leadership positions in a Chinese secondary school. We find that leadership service increases test scores, increases students’ political popularity in the classroom, makes students more likely to take initiative, and shapes students’ beliefs about the determinants of success. The results suggest that leadership service may impact human capital and is not solely a signal of preexisting skills. Data are available at . This paper was accepted by John List, behavioral economics.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2016.2483 [Google]

 

Ata, B., A. Skaro and S. Tayur (2017): OrganJet: Overcoming Geographical Disparities in Access to Deceased Donor Kidneys in the United States, Management Science, 63(9), pp.2776-2794

There are over 90,000 patients in the United States waiting for a kidney transplant. Under the current allocation policy, the vast majority of deceased organs are allocated locally. This causes significant disparities in waiting times and access to transplant across different geographical areas. To ameliorate this inequity, we propose an operational solution that offers affordable jet services (OrganJet) to patients on the transplant waiting list, allowing them to list in multiple different, and possibly very distant, donation service areas (DSAs) of their choosing. First, using a fluid approximation, we formulate the patients’ problem of choosing a location to multiple list as a selfish routing game in which each patient tries to minimize his ‘congestion cost,’ i.e., maximize his life expectancy. Through a combination of numerical, simulation, and analytical results, we show that multiple listing can lead to a significant improvement in geographic equity. In the special case when sufficiently many patients can multiple list, the geographic inequity disappears. Moreover, the supply of deceased donor organs increases under multiple listing, leading to more transplants and saved lives. We also consider a diffusion approximation and study the resulting multiple-listing game. The equilibrium outcome under the diffusion approximation is a second-order perturbation of that under the selfish routing formulation. In particular, the geographic equity metric, waiting times, and probabilities of receiving a transplant at various DSAs in equilibrium are second-order perturbations of those predicted by the selfish routing equilibrium. Hence, the analysis under the diffusion approximation also supports the finding that multiple listing leads to an improvement in geographic equity. In addition, restricting attention to the special case of sufficiently many patients multiple listing leads to an explicit characterization of the equilibria, which in turn yields additional structural insights. Last, we undertake a simulation study that supports aforementioned findings. This paper was accepted by Assaf Zeevi, stochastic models and simulation.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2016.2487 [Google]

 

Bouwens, J. and P. Kroos (2017): The Interplay Between Forward-Looking Measures and Target Setting, Management Science, 63(9), pp.2868-2884

We examine whether financial targets are based on both forward-looking and financial information, rather than on financial information only. We collect sales and performance appraisal data of store managers in a retail chain. The firm issues directives focused on the provision of excellent customer service and assesses store managers’ compliance with these directives subjectively. We demonstrate that, controlling for current sales, compliance with directives scores predicts future sales performance. We find that, next to objective sales information, this forward-looking information is impounded in the next year’s sales target. Finally, we find some evidence that suggests that incorporating forward-looking information improves the accuracy of sales targets. This paper was accepted by Mary Barth, accounting.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1287/mnsc.2016.2481 [Google]

 

Goode, S., H. Hoehle, V. Venkatesh and S. A. Brown (2017): USER COMPENSATION AS A DATA BREACH RECOVERY ACTION: AN INVESTIGATION OF THE SONY PLAYSTATION NETWORK BREACH, MIS Quarterly, 41(3), pp.703-A716

Drawing on expectation confirmation research, we develop hypotheses regarding the effect of compensation on key customer outcomes following a major data breach and consequent service recovery effort. Data were collected in a longitudinal field study of Sony customers during their data breach in 2011. A total of 144 customers participated in the two-phase data collection that began when the breach was announced and concluded after reparations were made. Using polynomial modeling and response surface analysis, we demonstrate that a modified assimilation–contrast model explained perceptions of service quality and continuance intention and a generalized negativity model explained repurchase intention. The results of our work contribute to research on data breaches and service failure by demonstrating the impacts of compensation on customer outcomes. We discuss theoretical and practical implications.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/ [Google]

 

Ranjan, C., K. Paynabar, J. E. Helm and J. Pan (2017): The Impact of Estimation: A New Method for Clustering and Trajectory Estimation in Patient Flow Modeling, Production & Operations Management, 26(10), pp.1893-1914

The ability to accurately forecast and control inpatient census, and thereby workloads, is a critical and long-standing problem in hospital management. The majority of current literature focuses on optimal scheduling of inpatients, but largely ignores the process of accurate estimation of the trajectory of patients throughout the treatment and recovery process. The result is that current scheduling models are optimizing based on inaccurate input data. We developed a Clustering and Scheduling Integrated (CSI) approach to capture patient flows through a network of hospital services. CSI functions by clustering patients into groups based on similarity of trajectory using a novel semi-Markov model (SMM)-based clustering scheme, as opposed to clustering by patient attributes as in previous literature. Our methodology is validated by simulation and then applied to real patient data from a partner hospital where we demonstrate that it outperforms a suite of well-established clustering methods. Furthermore, we demonstrate that extant optimization methods achieve significantly better results on key hospital performance measures under CSI, compared with traditional estimation approaches, increasing elective admissions by 97% and utilization by 22% compared to 30% and 8% using traditional estimation techniques. From a theoretical standpoint, the SMM-clustering is a novel approach applicable to any temporal-spatial stochastic data that is prevalent in many industries and application areas.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/poms.12722 [Google]

 

Prado-Gascó, V., F. Calabuig Moreno, V. Añó Sanz, J. Núñez-Pomar and J. Crespo Hervás (2017): To post or not to post: social media sharing and sporting event performance, Psychology & Marketing, 34(11), pp.995-1003

Social networks are becoming increasingly important for consumers, especially in the context of sport, where the service experience is highly intense. Few studies have combined subjective event performance variables and social network variables to analyze social network content sharing by sports practitioners. This article investigates the use of social networks in relation to sporting events. An empirical study examined the role of social network variables and sporting event performance variables in social media use. The sample consisted of 410 triathletes (72.2% male) aged between 18 and 66 years (mean 37.03 ± 8.62). Four analyses were performed using fuzzy-set qualitative comparative analysis to examine the causes of sharing comments through social media, sharing photos and videos on social media, participant satisfaction, and word-of-mouth (WOM). The event’s general image was a necessary condition in all cases. The combination of participants’ satisfaction and positive event image and the combination of social network use and positive event image lead to social network content sharing by athletes. The combination of positive event image and participant satisfaction leads to a positive WOM.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mar.21038 [Google]

 

Revilla-Camacho, M.-Á., M. Vega-Vázquez and F.-J. Cossío-Silva (2017): Exploring the customer’s intention to switch firms: The role of customer-related antecedents, Psychology & Marketing, 34(11), pp.1039-1049

This study examined the customer-related antecedents of the customer’s intention to switch firms. Customer citizenship behavior was a key element in this study. Scholars have extensively studied the antecedents of customer citizenship behavior. However, the way that customer citizenship behavior relates to other attitudinal variables and the intention to switch has scarcely been analyzed. The proposed hypotheses were verified using partial least squares variance-based structural equation modeling applied to 947 users of beauty care service firms in five countries. The results suggest that customer citizenship behavior is an antecedent of satisfaction, trust, and attitudinal loyalty. Two of these variables influence customers’ intentions to abandon relationships with the service provider. The implications of these findings enhance managers’ and scholars’ understanding of the determinants of customers’ intentions to switch firms.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/mar.21043 [Google]

 

Raffiee, J. (2017): Employee Mobility and Interfirm Relationship Transfer: Evidence from the Mobility and Client Attachments of United States Federal Lobbyists, 1998-2014, Strategic Management Journal, 38(10), pp.2019-2040

Research summary: Employee mobility can erode competitive advantage by facilitating interfirm knowledge and relationship transfer. This study investigates the latter and identifies factors that influence the likelihood of its occurrence. Using a novel database that tracks the employment and client attachments of U.S. federal lobbyists, I show that repeated exchange with employees (firms) increases (decreases) the likelihood clients follow employees who switch firms. Structurally, multiplexity reduces the likelihood of client transfer and weakens the effect of employee-client repeated exchange, with the multiplexity effect strongest when team members have specialized expertise. By examining the main and interactive effects of repeated exchange, multiplexity, and specialized human capital, this study extends prior work by demonstrating how individual, organizational, and structural relationship characteristics affect client transfer and retention ex-post employee mobility. Managerial summary: When do clients follow employees who switch firms? What can firms do to guard against it? These questions are important in service-based industries where clients may become loyal to individual employees within the firm rather than to the firm itself. This study provides evidence that helps practicing managers: (a) identify which clients are most at risk of defecting if employees exit, and (b) structure relationships in ways that mitigate the likelihood that employee exit results in client loss. Findings suggest that a client is more likely to defect when she has extensive history working with the exiting employee, particularly if the employee was the sole link between the client and firm. Managers, however, can reduce the risk of client loss following employee exit by structuring relationships so that clients work with teams of employees rather than exclusively with an individual and by increasing the degree of specialization within these teams. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/smj.2634 [Google]

 

 

Berry, L. L., T. S. Danaher, R. A. Chapman and R. L. A. Awdish (2017): Role of Kindness in Cancer Care, Journal of Oncology Practice, (), pp.JOP.2017.026195

The wonders of high-tech cancer care are best complemented by the humanity of high-touch care. Simple kindnesses can help to diffuse negative emotions that are associated with cancer diagnosis and treatment?and may even help to improve patients? outcomes. On the basis of our experience in cancer care and research, we propose six types of kindness in cancer care: deep listening, whereby clinicians take the time to truly understand the needs and concerns of patients and their families; empathy for the patient with cancer, expressed by both individual clinicians and the care culture, that seeks to prevent avoidable suffering; generous acts of discretionary effort that go beyond what patients and families expect from a care team; timely care that is delivered by using a variety of tools and systems that reduce stress and anxiety; gentle honesty, whereby the truth is conveyed directly in well-chosen, guiding words; and support for family caregivers, whose physical and mental well-being are vital components of the care their loved ones receive. These mutually reinforcing manifestations of kindness?exhibited by self-aware clinicians who understand that how care is delivered matters?constitute a powerful and practical way to temper the emotional turmoil of cancer for patients, their families, and clinicians themselves.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1200/JOP.2017.026195 [Google]

 

Alison, Z. P., H. W. Gillian, E. W. Keith and B. Emma (2017): Value co-creation in high-involvement services: the animal healthcare sector, International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, 45(5), pp.518-531

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to investigate the significance of value co-creation to the UK animal healthcare sector from the perspective of the key industry stakeholders: clients, veterinarians and paraprofessionals. Design/methodology/approach Value co-creation constructs in the sector were identified and measured using a mixed methods approach comprised of qualitative NVivo? thematic analysis of depth interviews (n=13) and quantitative exploratory factor analysis (EFA) (n=271). Findings Qualitative results revealed nine underlying dimensions regarding service delivery in the sector: trustworthiness, communication, value for money, empathy, bespoke, integrated care, tangibles, accessibility and outcome driven service. EFA of professional survey data loaded onto seven latent factors, with strong value co-creation dimensions identified. Research limitations/implications The sampling process is sufficiently representative and diverse to present meaningful and valuable results, however, surveying should be extended to include the client group. Due to the originality of the research replication of the study will be beneficial to the broader understanding and application of value co-creation to the high-involvement services of animal healthcare. Practical implications Recognition of the importance of value co-creation to the sector should encourage professional stakeholders to develop and adopt integrated models of service provision and to provide improved levels of service quality. Originality/value The paper makes an original contribution to knowledge regarding value co-creation in respect of high-involvement service provision. Its findings should be of value to academics interested in value co-creation in service sectors as well as animal healthcare practitioners seeking to offer better value and quality service provision.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/IJRDM-11-2016-0209 [Google]

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