Considered Service-specific journals were Journal of Service Research, Journal of Service Management, Journal of Services Marketing, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, Service Industries Journal, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, and Service Science.

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Lam, S. K., S. Sleep, T. Hennig-Thurau, S. Sridhar and A. R. Saboo (2017): Leveraging Frontline Employees’ Small Data And Firm-Level Big Data In Frontline Management, Journal of Service Research, 20(1), pp.12-28

The advent of new forms of data, modern technology, and advanced data analytics offer service providers both opportunities and risks. This article builds on the phenomenon of big data and offers an integrative conceptual framework that captures not only the benefits but also the costs of big data for managing the frontline employee (FLE)-customer interaction. Along the positive path, the framework explains how the “3Vs” of big data (volume, velocity, and variety) have the potential to improve service quality and reduce service costs by influencing big data value and organizational change at the firm and FLE levels. However, the 3Vs of big data also increase big data veracity, which casts doubt about the value of big data. The authors further propose that because of heterogeneity in big data absorptive capacities at the firm level, the costs of adopting big data in FLE management may outweigh the benefits. Finally, while FLEs can benefit from big data, extracting knowledge from such data does not discount knowledge derived from FLEs’ small data. Rather, combining and integrating the firm’s big data with FLEs’ small data are crucial to absorbing and applying big data knowledge. An agenda for future research concludes.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670516679271 [Google]

 

Marinova, D., K. de Ruyter, M.-H. Huang, M. L. Meuter and G. Challagalla (2017): Getting Smart, Journal of Service Research, 20(1), pp.29-42

Smart technologies are rapidly transforming frontline employee-customer interactions. However, little academic research has tackled urgent, relevant questions regarding such technology-empowered frontline interactions. The current study conceptualizes (1) smart technology use in frontline employee-customer interactions, (2) smart technology–mediated learning mechanisms that elevate service effectiveness and efficiency performance to empower frontline interactions, and (3) stakeholder interaction goals as antecedents of smart technology–mediated learning. We propose that emerging smart technologies, which can substitute for or complement frontline employees’ (FLEs) efforts to deliver customized service over time, may help resolve the long-standing tension between service efficiency and effectiveness because they can learn or enable learning from and across customers, FLEs, and interactions. Drawing from pragmatic and deliberate learning theories, the authors conceptualize stakeholder learning mechanisms that mediate the effects of frontline interaction goals on FLEs’ and customers’ effectiveness and efficiency outcomes. This study concludes with implications for research and practice.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670516679273 [Google]

 

Rafaeli, A., D. Altman, D. D. Gremler, M.-H. Huang, D. Grewal, B. Iyer, A. Parasuraman and K. de Ruyter (2017): The Future Of Frontline Research, Journal of Service Research, 20(1), pp.91-99

This article contains a set of six invited commentaries written by leading scholars, expressing varied perspectives on the future of frontline research and on the frontline domain itself. The article accompanies the Journal of Service Research special issue on organizational frontlines. In their commentaries, the authors share insightful views on areas of personal interest ranging from employee emotion and customer relationship building to the effect of technology and its implementation at the organizational frontline. Included within each commentary are managerial insights and suggestions for needed research in the highlighted area.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670516679275 [Google]

 

Rapp, A. A., D. G. Bachrach, K. E. Flaherty, D. E. Hughes, C. M. Voorhees and A. Sharma (2017): The Role Of The Sales-Service Interface And Ambidexterity In The Evolving Organization, Journal of Service Research, 20(1), pp.59-75

Despite a long history of independent sales and service functions within organizations, customers are pressuring organizations to rethink their sales and service operations. Specifically, customers expect organizations to offer a “single face” of the firm rather than being forced to interact with multiple agents across both sales and service throughout their relationships. As firms attempt to meet these customer demands, they have countless options to integrate sales and service operations, but little is known about which strategies are most effective. This article attempts to shed new light into the challenges and potential benefits of sales-service integration, in an effort to spur research in this area and better inform this managerial challenge. Specifically, we formalize the concept of the sales-service interface, discuss how it relates to sales-service ambidexterity, and identify several opportunities for future research. Given the complexity of the sales-service interface, we contend that future researchers must view these issues through a multilevel lens and, as a result, we focus on identifying opportunities ideally suited for testing in a multilevel environment. The goal of this article is to provide a platform for researchers to tackle this challenging problem and generate new insights into how best to meet customer’s evolving demands.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670516679274 [Google]

 

Singh, J., M. Brady, T. Arnold and T. Brown (2017): The Emergent Field Of Organizational Frontlines, Journal of Service Research, 20(1), pp.3-11

Advances in frontline interface technologies and devices are profoundly disrupting how organizations and customers interact to create and exchange value. Where once customer interactions were limited in variety, multiplicity, and complexity, today’s broadband Internet and wireless connection technologies defy limitations to enable organization-customer interactions of ever-increasing diversity and consistency across multiple points of customer contact. No longer are the frontlines inert backgrounds for organizational action involving customers; rather, they are evolving as sites of vibrant innovations and interventions that engage customers, enhance customer experiences, and motivate value (co)creation. To anchor this emergent field, we define organizational frontlines at the intersection of interfaces and interactions that connect organizations and their customers. We historically trace the use of “organizational frontlines” from its initial application in military and management domains through its current and proposed position in both academic and practitioner contexts. We illustrate our definition to highlight research opportunities and underscore the strategic implications for effectively managing organizational frontlines to secure competitive advantage. We conclude with a discussion of special issue articles and the exciting agenda they collectively engage.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670516681513 [Google]

 

van Doorn, J., M. Mende, S. M. Noble, J. Hulland, A. L. Ostrom, D. Grewal and J. A. Petersen (2017): Domo Arigato Mr. Roboto, Journal of Service Research, 20(1), pp.43-58

Technology is rapidly changing the nature of service, customers’ service frontline experiences, and customers’ relationships with service providers. Based on the prediction that in the marketplace of 2025, technology (e.g., service-providing humanoid robots) will be melded into numerous service experiences, this article spotlights technology’s ability to engage customers on a social level as a critical advancement of technology infusions. Specifically, it introduces the novel concept of automated social presence (ASP; i.e., the extent to which technology makes customers feel the presence of another social entity) to the services literature. The authors develop a typology that highlights different combinations of automated and human social presence in organizational frontlines and indicates literature gaps, thereby emphasizing avenues for future research. Moreover, the article presents a conceptual framework that focuses on (a) how the relationship between ASP and several key service and customer outcomes is mediated by social cognition and perceptions of psychological ownership as well as (b) three customer-related factors that moderate the relationship between ASP and social cognition and psychological ownership (i.e., a customer’s relationship orientation, tendency to anthropomorphize, and technology readiness). Finally, propositions are presented that can be a catalyst for future work to enhance the understanding of how technology infusion, particularly service robots, influences customers’ frontline experiences in the future.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670516679272 [Google]

 

Zablah, A. R., N. J. Sirianni, S. E. Beatty, D. Korschun and D. D. Gremler (2017): Emotional Convergence In Service Relationships, Journal of Service Research, 20(1), pp.76-90

The literature establishes that customer and frontline employee (FLE) emotions converge during their encounters as a result of a transient, contagion-based process in which emotions flow from one actor to another. Recent evidence suggests, however, that this transient process does not produce emotional convergence among frontline dyads engaged in ongoing exchange, a surprising finding, given the wealth of evidence in support of the idea that customers and FLEs engaged in relational exchange strongly influence one another. In light of this evidence, we argue here that customers and FLEs engaged in ongoing exchange experience similar emotions not as a result of the transient transfer of emotions, but because they develop the tendency to undergo a similar emotional response to relationship events, a phenomenon we call the shared frontline experience. Informed by the social psychology literature, we support this idea by advancing a conceptual model that highlights the role of relationship closeness, personality similarity, and dyadic attachment style in producing the shared frontline experience. The proposed model also suggests that firms stand to benefit from the shared frontline experience of customers and FLEs if they provide the dyad with autonomy, a decision not without risk. Future research directions suggested by this perspective are discussed.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1094670516675405 [Google]

 

Altschwager, T., J. Conduit, T. Bouzdine-Chameeva and S. Goodman (2017): Branded Marketing Events: Engaging Australian And French Wine Consumers, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 27(2), pp.336-357

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to introduce the term branded marketing events (BMEs), and examine the role of its experiential components as a strategic tool for the facilitation of customer brand engagement. This study examines five experiential components of BMEs at events held in Australia and France to determine their respective impact on customer brand engagement. Design/methodology/approach Surveys were distributed to attendees of ten events by six wine brands in South Australia, and six events in five sub-regions of Bordeaux. Findings Findings suggest that BMEs influence customers? brand engagement and brand purchase intention in both Australia and France. However, the experiential components within the events had differing effects. Australian customers were influenced by cognitive, sensorial, and relational experiences and their increased customer brand engagement strongly influenced brand purchase intention. French customers, however, required pragmatic event experiences to build brand engagement. Originality/value Recognizing their mutual experiential and interactive foundations, this study integrates the research domains of marketing events, customer experiences and customer brand engagement, and contributes to the strategic understanding of how branded event experiences facilitate customer brand engagement.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-04-2015-0108 [Google]

 

Chen, Y.-C., Y.-C. Shen, C. T.-Y. Lee and F.-K. Yu (2017): Measuring Quality Variations In E-Service, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 27(2), pp.427-452

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to develop and validate a multidimensional hierarchical scale for measuring ?e-service quality variation.? Design/methodology/approach Based on the psychometric scale-development approach, qualitative and quantitative methods were employed to develop the e-SERVAR scale. A multidimensional hierarchical factor structure of e-SERVAR is proposed, along with a set of preliminary items derived from literature and the qualitative study. Furthermore, the Yahoo website in Taiwan was chosen to be the target e-service website for data collection to develop the e-SERVAR scale. A series of statistical methods (i.e. item-to-total correlations, exploratory factor analyses, CFAs and structural equation modeling) were adopted to verify construct reliability and validity as well as nomological validity of the scale. Findings A 41-item e-SERVAR scale based on the structure of a hierarchical factor model was developed that contains three primary dimensions (i.e. information, system and fulfillment) and nine subdimensions (information accuracy, information quantity, information timeliness, information usefulness, system reliability, system security, merchandise quality, merchandise delivery timeliness and merchandise security). Practical implications The results of this study help managers identify sources of quality variability and design efficacious strategies to reduce such variability in order to improve the overall e-service quality. Originality/value Prior research of e-service quality has paid less attention to the role of e-service quality variability. Discussion of e-service quality variability was mainly conceptual in nature. This research presents the e-SERVAR scale as a measurement tool that provides a new avenue for researchers to study how to improve e-service quality by measuring service variability.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-03-2015-0063 [Google]

 

Gosling, M., J. Richard and Y. Seo (2017): Markets And Market Boundaries: A Social Practice Approach, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 27(2), pp.408-426

Purpose The paper contributes to the debate on a general theory of markets. The purpose of this paper is to develop a market practice model based on social practice theories, and explore new ways of describing market boundaries. Design/methodology/approach A conceptual analysis of contemporary marketing directions and market theorizations provides a basis for defining markets and market boundaries in terms of social practices and their performances by market actors. Findings Based on the market performances held in place by institutional practices that define, contextualize and stabilize a market, this paper defines market boundaries by nine specific categories of practices, described here as parameters. Research limitations/implications This is a conceptual paper. Future research using empirical evidence derived from situated investigations should endeavor to refine the model and practices that define market boundaries. Originality/value The paper provides a new conceptualization of markets and market boundaries from the social practice perspective, and advances contemporary market theorizing that puts services at the center of exchange. The paper offers managerial implications by describing alternative means for analyzing markets and developing corresponding competitive strategies. Furthermore, the conception of market boundaries as nine parameters provides insights beyond the geographic and price boundaries typically used to describe market limits and exchange processes when developing policy.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-04-2015-0107 [Google]

 

Hartley, N. and T. Green (2017): Consumer Construal Of Separation In Virtual Services, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 27(2), pp.358-383

Purpose Service encounters are becoming increasingly virtual through the infusion of computer-mediated technologies. Virtual services separate consumers and service providers both spatially and temporally. With the advent of virtual services is the need to theoretically explain how service separability is psychologically perceived by consumers across the spectrum of computer-mediated technologies. Drawing on construal-level theory, the purpose of this paper is to conceptualize a theoretical framework depicting consumer?s construal of spatial and temporal separation across a continuum of technology-mediated service virtuality. Design/methodology/approach The authors conducted two studies: first, to investigate consumers? levels of mental construal associated with varying degrees of service separation across a spectrum of technology-mediated services; second, to empirically examine consumer evaluations of service quality in response to varying degrees of spatial and temporal service separation. These relationships were tested across two service industries: education and tourism. Findings Consumers mentally construe psychological distance in response to service separation and these observations vary across the spectrum of service offerings ranging from face-to-face (no psychological distance) through to virtual (spatially and temporally separated ? high psychological distance) services. Further, spatial separation negatively affects consumers? service evaluations; such that as service separation increases, consumers? service evaluations decrease. No such significant findings support the similar effect of temporal separation on customer service evaluations. Moreover, specific service industry-based distances exist such that consumers responded differentially for a credence (education) vs an experiential (tourism) service. Originality/value Recent studies in services marketing have challenged the inseparability assumption inherent for services. This paper builds on this knowledge and is the first to integrate literature on construal-level theory, service separability, and virtual services into a holistic conceptual framework which explains variance in consumer evaluations of separated service encounters. This is important due to the increasingly virtual nature of service provider-customer interactions across a diverse range of service industries (i.e. banking and finance, tourism, education, and health care). Service providers must be cognisant of the psychological barriers which are imposed by increased technology infusion in virtual services.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-05-2015-0118 [Google]

 

Karpen, I. O., G. Gemser and G. Calabretta (2017): A Multilevel Consideration Of Service Design Conditions: Towards A Portfolio Of Organisational Capabilities, Interactive Practices And Individual Abilities, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 27(2), pp.384-407

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to advance the current understanding of organisational conditions that facilitate service design. Specifically, the focus is on organisational capabilities, interactive practices and individual abilities as units of analysis across service system levels. Grounded in design principles, the paper conceptualises and delineates illustrative service design conditions and introduces a respective service design capability-practice-ability (CPA) portfolio. In doing so, an emerging microfoundations perspective in the context of service design is advanced. Design/methodology/approach Conceptual paper. Findings This paper identifies and delineates a CPA that contributes to service design and ultimately customer experiences. The service design CPA consists of six illustrative constellations of service design capabilities, practices and abilities, which operate on different organisational levels. The service design CPA builds the foundation for in-depth research implications and future research opportunities. Practical implications The CPA framework suggests that if an organisation seeks to optimise service design and subsequent customer experiences, then individual- and organisational-level (cap)abilities and interactive practices should be optimised and synchronised across specific CPA constellations. Originality/value This paper provides the first microfoundations perspective for service design. It advances marketing theory through multilevel theorising around service design capabilities, practices and abilities and overcomes extant limitations of insular theorising in this context.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-05-2015-0121 [Google]

 

Lindholm, A., T. J. Laine and P. Suomala (2017): The Potential Of Management Accounting And Control In Global Operations: Profitability-Driven Service Business Development, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 27(2), pp.496-514

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to identify the financial potential of new service businesses in the context of a global machinery manufacturer. The objective is to examine the supportive role of management accounting (MA) and control in service business development, which has not been empirically examined previously. Design/methodology/approach The paper takes advantage of an interventionist case study at a global machinery manufacturer and is empirically based on a comprehensive examination of the service business potential in the selected product category in different market areas. The researchers were actively involved in the accounting development activities underlying this paper. Findings The results suggest that the development of a global service business is necessary to build on market area characteristics. An analysis should combine financial information and equipment fleet information across product lines and organizational units. Research limitations/implications MA and control practices tend to require significant development to actually support the process of identifying and capturing the service business potentials. As the findings are limited to one case environment, further studies should address the longitudinal evolution of MA and control, and the choice and utilization of different performance measures, in similar contexts. Practical implications The paper provides managerial insights on how to utilize MA information and proposes ideas for performance indicators. Originality/value The process examined in this paper responds to the need for tools and techniques supporting service business development. MA and control could provide a comprehensive understanding of the dynamics of service business profitability potential and support in identifying and prioritizing the possible avenues of realizing such potential.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-05-2016-0106 [Google]

 

Lorenz, M. P., J. R. Ramsey, A. Tariq and D. L. Morrell (2017): Service Excellence In The Light Of Cultural Diversity: The Impact Of Metacognitive Cultural Intelligence, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 27(2), pp.475-495

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to understand when, how, and why service employees adapt the service encounter to meet the values and expectations of culturally disparate customers. Design/methodology/approach The authors tested the hypothesized framework utilizing a scenario-based experimental study. In total, a sample of 296 prospective restaurant service employees were asked to evaluate their willingness to adapt their behavior when faced with cultural differences as well as out group status. Furthermore, respondents were asked to assess their level of metacognitive cultural intelligence. Findings The authors found that both perceived cultural differences and out group status positively affect the service employee?s willingness to adapt their behavior. Further, cultural intelligence (CQ) positively moderates one of those two direct relationships. Originality/value The authors extend the literature on the service-adjustment process, as well as the managerial implications of service adjustment. The study is among the first to introduce the role of the service employees? CQ in adaptation to an intercultural service encounter.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-02-2016-0044 [Google]

 

Osei-Frimpong, K. (2017): Patient Participatory Behaviours In Healthcare Service Delivery: Self-Determination Theory (Sdt) Perspective, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 27(2), pp.453-474

Purpose The purpose of this paper is to deepen the understanding on patient participatory behaviours in co-creation of value drawing from the perspective of self-determination theory (SDT) focussing on motivation in particular. Design/methodology/approach A model is proposed to suggest the influence of the various motivation types on a patient?s participatory behaviours drawing from SDT. Following survey design approach, data collected from 345 outpatients from a quasi-government health facility in Accra, Ghana are examined through structural equation modelling using SmartPLS (v. 3.2.3). Findings The findings reveal that patient participatory behaviours are influenced by both controlled and autonomous regulations leading to value attainment. External regulation (a more controlled form of extrinsic motivation) and patient participation in clinical encounters have no significant relationship with a patient?s commitment to compliance with medical instructions. The results reveal patient compliance is largely driven by autonomous regulation as proposed by SDT. However, active patient participation in clinical encounters and commitment to compliance with medical instructions positively and significantly influences perceived value outcomes. Research limitations/implications This research provides empirical evidence in support of understanding patient participatory behaviours in healthcare service delivery by testing theoretically grounded hypotheses developed from SDT perspective. The study focussed on outpatients from one quasi-government health facility, which could limit the generalisation of the findings reported. Practical implications This study illustrates the need for service providers to understand participant?s needs and motivation during the service encounter. This is essential as the various types of motivation influence the nature of the participation throughout the process, which could help improve on the value outcomes from the service. Originality/value This study makes a significant contribution to service literature through the application of SDT to explain patient participatory behaviours in healthcare service delivery, production and value outcomes. From a theoretical perspective, the developed model integrates multiple research disciplines (e.g. SDT, participatory behaviours, and value co-creation) and extends research on patient integration, participation, and compliance.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-02-2016-0038 [Google]

 

Seo, Y., C. Kelleher and R. J. Brodie (2017): Broadening Brand Engagement Within The Service-Centric Perspective: An Intersubjective Hermeneutic Framework, Journal of Service Theory and Practice, 27(2), pp.317-335

Purpose While extant service-centric research has largely focussed on managerial advantages, few studies have addressed how brand engagement emerges in the broader context of consumer lives. The purpose of this paper is to develop a novel intersubjective hermeneutic framework that bridges the socially constructed as well as the individualised meanings of brand engagement in the context of service research. Design/methodology/approach This conceptual paper adopts a theory-building approach based on recent developments in the service-centric marketing literature. Findings The authors offer a novel theoretical perspective that recognises the intersubjective and phenomenological nature of individual and collective consumer brand experiences, and show how such experiences emerge from socially constructed brand engagement practices using the co-constituting lens of value-in-use. Research limitations/implications The proposed conceptual framework invites further empirical and contextual investigations of intersubjective brand engagement in both online and offline contexts. Originality/value The contribution of this framework is twofold. First, the authors draw on the intersubjective orientation and hermeneutic framework to provide conceptual clarity in relation to the nature of brand engagement practices, brand experiences, and value-in-use, and discuss their interrelationships. Second, the authors address the nature of meaning ascribed to engagement beyond customer-firm-brand relationships, and discuss why any given consumer?s experience of brand engagement reflects a complex dialectic between socially constructed and individualised brand meanings. In doing so, the integrative framework recognises the interplay between the intersubjective and phenomenological natures of consumer brand experiences, and offers insights as to how these experiences are framed by broader socially constructed engagement practices.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1108/JSTP-02-2015-0055 [Google]

 

Chan, E. K., R. Kwortnik and B. Wansink (2017): McHealthy: How Marketing Incentives Influence Healthy Food Choices, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 58(1), pp.6-22

Food choices are often habitual, which can perpetuate unhealthy behaviors; that is, selection of foods high in sodium, saturated fat, and calories. This article extends previous research by examining how marketing incentives can encourage healthy food choices. Building on research examining marketing incentives, temporal goals, and habitual behavior, this research shows that certain incentives (behavioral rewards vs. financial discounts) affect individuals with healthy and less healthy eating habits differently. A field study conducted at a corporate cafeteria and three lab studies converge on a consistent finding: The effects of marketing incentives on healthy food choice are particularly prominent for people who have less healthy eating habits. Results showed that behavioral rewards generated a 28.5% (vs. 5.5%) increase in salad sales; behavioral rewards also led to 2 pounds more weight loss for individuals with less healthy eating habits. The research offers important implications for scholars, the food industry, consumers, governments, and policy makers.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965516668403 [Google]

 

Chen, M., Y. Lyu, Y. Li, X. Zhou and W. Li (2017): The Impact of High-Commitment HR Practices on Hotel Employees’ Proactive Customer Service Performance, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 58(1), pp.94-107

To explore the organizational antecedents of proactive customer service performance (PCSP), we developed and tested a multi-level model of the impact of high-commitment human resource (HR) practices on PCSP in the hospitality industry. Drawing on the proactive motivation model, the mediating roles of work-related self-efficacy, perceived organizational support, and harmonious passion for work are examined simultaneously in the relationship between high-commitment HR practices and PCSP. Using time-lagged data from 94 hotels in China, we found that high-commitment HR practices positively influenced service employees’ PCSP via work-related self-efficacy, perceived organizational support, and harmonious passion for work. We discuss the theoretical and managerial implications of this research and also give some suggestions on how to effectively adopt and implement high-commitment HR practices.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965516649053 [Google]

 

Kim, Y., M. Kim and A. S. Mattila (2017): Corporate Social Responsibility and Equity- Holder Risk in the Hospitality Industry, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 58(1), pp.81-93

This study examined whether corporate social responsibility (CSR) enhances firm value for shareholders, who ultimately fund a firm’s CSR initiatives. Specifically, we investigated the relationship between the CSR activities of a hospitality firm and the risks associated with equity holding of the firm. Using MSCI Environmental, Social, and Governance ratings from 1991 to 2008, we measured the extent of CSR efforts of firms and tested the effect of CSR on two different types of equity-holder risks (i.e., systematic and unsystematic risks) across four segments in the hospitality industry (airlines, hotels, casinos, and restaurants). CSR was found to reduce the systematic risk of restaurants and casinos firms significantly, whereas it had no significant influence on the unsystematic risk in any of the segments. The results of this study have important theoretical and practical implications to the academia and the hospitality industry.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965516649052 [Google]

 

Ling, Q., F. Liu and X. Wu (2017): Servant Versus Authentic Leadership: Assessing Effectiveness in China’s Hospitality Industry, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 58(1), pp.53-68

This study compares the effectiveness of servant versus authentic leadership in hospitality firms by examining relationships with group-level trust and individual-level work outcomes (i.e., organizational commitment, work engagement, and work performance), and their influencing mechanisms through trust climate. Using two-wave data from 1,132 employee- supervisor pairs from 80 departments in 16 star-level hotels in China, we find that these two forms of leadership have positive effects on group trust climate and employee work outcomes; however, the magnitudes and paths of their effects are distinct. In comparison with authentic leadership, servant leadership has a more significant effect on creating a trust climate and a more direct effect regarding increasing employees’ positive work attitudes (i.e., organizational commitment and work engagement), ultimately influencing work performance. This study also demonstrates the importance of group trust climate in relationships between group-level leadership and individual-level employee work attitudes and performance. These findings extend the scope of servant and authentic leadership research, and advocate servant leadership in the hospitality industry.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965516641515 [Google]

 

Lu, L., I. Rahman and C. G.-Q. Chi (2017): Ready to Embrace Genetically Modified Wines? The Role of Knowledge Exposure and Intrinsic Wine Attributes, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 58(1), pp.23-38

This study examines whether knowledge exposure and supreme wine attributes such as appearance, aroma, taste, and hangover avoidance influence consumers’ quality evaluation and purchase intentions of genetically modified (GM) wines. We conducted two experimental studies in two different settings involving a total of 321 subjects. Results indicate that educating consumers with knowledge on GM wines efficiently reduces the fear caused by GM identity. Importantly, the desirable organoleptic and functional performances of GM wines not only reduce consumers’ concerns with GM products but also enable GM wines to surpass conventional options that are less salient in these performances. Specifically, consumers would choose a GM wine over traditional options if the GM wine has a superior appearance and the ability to eliminate a hangover. Furthermore, consumers express equal acceptance of GM wines and traditional counterparts when there are no differences in aroma and taste. This research delivers significant implications for wine marketing through examining a timely and controversial subject matter.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965516629775 [Google]

 

Naquin, C. E., T. R. Kurtzberg and L. Lewin (2017): High Tech Versus High Touch: Comparing Electronic and Hard-Copy Gift Cards, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 58(1), pp.108-113

Previous research in the area of how individuals respond to hard-copy versus electronic communications indicates inconsistent results. Although media richness theory suggests that there is no theoretical distinction between physical, hard-copy and electronic, text-based communications, other research has shown that an individual’s response varies depending on the type of communication. The present research explores the reaction to unexpected opportunities as a function of how the communications are received–either via email or as a hard-copy. Results indicate that participants were equally satisfied to receive either an electronic or a physical gift certificate; however, they redeemed them in unequal amounts. Participants who received a physical gift card were more likely to redeem their gifts and were more likely to spend a greater amount of the total gift card than those who received an electronic one.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965516643755 [Google]

 

Singh, A. (2017): The Effects of Securitization, Foreclosure, and Hotel Characteristics on Distressed Hotel Prices, Resolution Time, and Recovery Rate, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 58(1), pp.39-52

This study investigates the effects of securitization, foreclosure, and hotel characteristics on the sale prices of distressed hotels as well as their influence on resolution time and recovery rate. Using a sample of 4,763 financially distressed hotels between 2010 and 2014, this study provides evidence that hotel size, securitization, foreclosure, and disposal methods are important predictors of distressed property prices, resolution time, and recovery rate.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965516639124 [Google]

 

Zoghbi-Manrique-de-Lara, P., J.-M. Ting-Ding and R. Guerra-Baez (2017): Indispensable, Expendable, or Irrelevant? Effects of Job Insecurity on the Employee Reactions to Perceived Outsourcing in the Hotel Industry, Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 58(1), pp.69-80

This study examines the role of job insecurity as a moderator that may trigger destructive responses by employees to perceived outsourcing of labor services. Although some studies have suggested that outsourcing might not be viewed favorably by the hotel staff, the article first argues that because outsourcing of labor can be a useful strategy for the effective functioning of a hotel, mere perceptions of outsourcing by internal employees should lead them to react favorably to the hotel in the form of citizenship (organizational citizenship behavior-organization [OCB-O]) and decreased deviance (deviant workplace behavior-organization [DWB-O]). We invoke unitarism theory, which emphasizes the shared interests of all the members of an organization. The article then argues that these reactions to outsourcing may become negative when internal employees note the presence of job insecurity, triggering decreased OCB-O and DWB-O. Data were collected from 215 in-house employees working concurrently with outsourced employees at 14 hotels in Gran Canaria (Spain). Structural equation modeling (SEM) results suggest that, contrary to expectations, perceived outsourcing leads employees to significantly increase their DWB-O, but not vary their OCB-O. Unlike OCB-O, these DWB-O reactions to perceived outsourcing became stronger among employees who were high rather than low in job insecurity. The findings suggest that job insecurity plays an expendable, but relevant, role in reactions to outsourcing that harm their success.

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1938965516648791 [Google]

 

 

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